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MSc Physical Activity and Public Health

This programme focuses on the promotion and maintenance of physical activity related to public health and wellbeing. There is a clear consensus that new professional scientific needs are emerging in this field. This programme recognises the need for specialisation in the intertwined disciplines of physical activity and public health, which is differentiated from other MSc courses in public health. The course has real word applicability and substantially contributes towards higher-level qualifications emerging in this area. There is a global demand of multi-skilled individuals with knowledge and understanding of research, policy and practice in relation to physical activity.

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Course content

This programme will equip you with key specific skills, and provide you with a unique insight into the intriguing interactions between physical activity and health, by infusing epidemiology, physiology, psychology and policy-relevant research. You will also develop important skills in designing and evaluating research and community interventions that promote health behaviour change.

 

Our facilities

Over the past few years, we have redeveloped both of our campuses so that you have the best facilities available as you study for your degree. We pride ourselves on the quality of the learning environment we can offer our students.  All of our facilities are designed for academic teaching, research, British Universities and Colleges Sport (BUCS) competitions and for your social/recreational use throughout the week and weekends.

The world-class Tudor Hale Centre for Sport is the focus of sporting activities, both academic and recreational, at the University. The Tudor Hale Centre for Sport incorporates a suite of state of the art sport science laboratories, a sports injury clinic, a strength and conditioning room and a fitness suite.  In addition, there is a sports hall used for basketball, netball, trampolining, badminton, volleyball, cricket, soccer, table tennis, hockey and ultimate frisbee.   Located beside the Tudor Hale Centre for Sport you will find our brand new Sports Dome, incorporating four indoor tennis courts, our all-weather astro turf pitch, and grass rugby pitch.

Facilities:

  • 5 x Kistler force plates
  • 1 x RS Scan pressure plate
  • 3 x EMG systems
  • 14 camera Vicon T-Series motion capture
  • Integrated Visual 3D analysis
  • Quintic video based kinematic analysis
  • Cybex Norm isokinetic dynamometer
  • Brand new Sports Dome, with four tennis courts, three netball courts
  • Sports hall
  • 110m synthetic athletics track
  • Modern fitness suite
  • Strength and conditioning room
  • Two multi-purpose gymnasiums
  • Indoor and outdoor climbing walls and climbing boulder
  • Grass football and rugby pitches
  • Outdoor netball and tennis court
  • Floodlit synthetic Astro Turf pitch
  • Two seminar rooms
  • Cricket nets

Sport Science Laboratories:

  • Four dedicated psychology labs
  • Two dedicated biomechanics labs
  • Five dedicated physiology labs
  • An environmental chamber to simulate heat, altitude, etc
  • A sports injury clinic and adjoining rehabilitation space

Where this can take you

Physical activity and public health are no longer viewed as the responsibility of only those working in the health sector. A wide range of opportunities are available in statutory, voluntary, charity, private and community organisations as well as in local government and academic institutions.

Students may also progress to further postgraduate study.

 

Indicative modules

  • Research methods and statistics
  • Principles and practice of physical activity and public health
  • Project planning and management for public health
  • Measurements in physical activity, public health and wellbeing
  • Enhancing physical activity participation and wellbeing
  • Physical activity in public health interventions: conceptualisation and design
  • The Research Dissertation

The course team has ensured that this course is characterised by an appropriate breadth and depth of content that includes the latest research, and a variety of teaching, learning and assessment methods. The teaching and learning methods used in the course reflect the wide variety of topics and techniques associated with physical activity and public health.

All modules will include formative assessment.  Formative assessment comprises feedback on students' performance, designed to help them learn more effectively and find ways to maintain and improve their progress. It does not contribute to the final mark, grade or class of degree awarded to the student.

Indicative methods of assessment:

  • Individual and group work
  • Written report
  • Oral and poster presentations
  • Practical skills assessment
  • Written examination
  • Research project dissertation

Teaching and assessment

Class sizes depend on the type of module. Specific modules may have up to 15 students and modules such as research methods and statistics will have up to 50 students.

The course team has ensured that this course is characterised by an appropriate breadth and depth of content that includes the latest research, and a variety of teaching, learning and assessment methods. The teaching and learning methods used in the course reflect the wide variety of topics and techniques associated with physical activity and public health.

Learning and teaching methods include:

  • Lectures and seminar led by academic staff or guest lectures
  • Laboratory classes for learning and practising techniques
  • Workshops for teaching a range of skills including research methods
  • Seminar investigating specific topics including case studies

Additional Costs

Include Additional Costs: 

Entry requirements

Typical offer to come on this course if a student has attained (or be about to attain) at least a first or upper second class honours degree in a related scientific still be offered a place on this course if they can show evidence of the potential to succeed based on professional and/or related experiences subject from a recognised institution of higher education.

Students with a lower second class award may be accepted if they can provide a transcript to show that they performed near the upper second class level on appropriate modules. If a student does not have these academic qualifications, they could have relevant professional experience that would be considered.