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BA (Hons) Creative Writing

This Creative Writing course will help you to find your voice by learning the craft of writing across a wide variety of genres.

You will work with published writers and will also explore the pleasures and challenges of developing your work from a first idea to an early draft to a finished poem, story or script.

You will join a lively writing culture in our department that includes regular readings by visiting writers, book launches, an annual publishing panel where you can meet and talk to agents and editors, and a chance to get your book published in our biennial Chichester Cinnamon Press competition.

The department also hosts Thresholds, the International Short Story Forum.

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Codes:

College C58

UCAS W801

Course Length:

3 Years Full Time

Entry requirements 2018

Typical Offer (individual offers may vary):

A levels (or combination with AS / E.P. / BTEC): 96 to 120 UCAS Tariff Points including English Literature, English Language, English Language and Literature, Creative Writing or Drama at grade B or C.

Access to HE Diploma: Pass with 12 level 3 credits worth of English units at Merit

International Baccalaureate: 28 points with English Higher at 4.

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Postgraduate Pathways

Postgraduate study options available at Chichester include PGCE and Masters. 

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Course content

The University of Chichester boasts one of the most experienced Creative Writing teams in the UK. You’ll work with highly qualified and experienced tutors, all of whom are practising and published poets, short story writers, novelists, dramatists and screen and TV writers.

In your first year, you will be introduced to the writing process through modules which help you develop a notebook, tap your own experience and engage with the wider world for material. You will also begin to learn the craft of Poetry, Prose and Life Writing You will also take two critical English modules to widen your knowledge of the tradition.

In year 2, you will deepen your practice of Poetry, Short fiction and Life Writing in detail. You will take modules in Radio Drama and Writing for the Stage as well as Children’s Fiction. There will also be the opportunity to take a module in Writing for TV. Once again, you will take two critical modules designed to complement your work in poetry and short fiction.

By year three, we feel you will know what you want to say and how you want to say it.

You will therefore be able to choose from a range of modules such as: Writing the Novel, Writing the Short Story, Screenwriting, Advanced Poetry, Writing for Children, Writing for the Stage, Writing Fantasy and Science Fiction, YA Fiction, Flash Fiction, Digital Writing and Writing Place and Environment. While publishing is a consistent element throughout the degree, in year three there is a designated module in Publishing, Production and Performance. The Writing Placement module allows you to develop your skills in a work environment, for example by working with a community group on a writing project.

The University also has a burgeoning writing culture, from regular book launches to conferences and events with creative writers. Some renowned authors to have visited the University in recent years include:

  • Poet Laureate Carol Ann Duffy
  • Matthew Sweeney
  • Helen Dunmore
  • Jo Shapcott
  • Sarah Hall
  • Bernardine Evaristo
  • Vicki Feaver

Where this can take you

Our graduates from this subject area are highly valued by employers for their problem solving and exceptional communication skills.

The key to an English or Creative Writing degree is communication, and at Chichester we focus on your abilities in written and spoken expression through:

  • group work and group presentations
  • opportunities to develop your self- managed research projects
  • developing your skills in critical analysis

Jobs directly related to your degree:

  • Publishing - editorial assistants help senior editorial staff in the administration of the commissioning, planning and production of books, journals and magazines. This role is a recognised starting point for editorial and publishing careers.
  • Writer - involved in the creation and/or development of all types of creative writing, including prose, poetry and material for the theatre, screen and radio and reviews.
  • Primary school teacher - teaches primary-aged children and develops schemes of work and lesson plans in line with curriculum objectives.
  • Secondary school teacher - teaches one or more national curriculum subjects to pupils aged 11-16, or up to 19 in schools with sixth forms.
  • English as a foreign language teacher - teaches English, either in the UK or overseas, to students whose first or main language is not English.
  • Lexicographer - writes, compiles and edits dictionaries. Monitors and records uses of language and uses databases to interrogate a wide range of evidence. Considers both the meaning and usages of words and compiles definitions in a structured manner.

Jobs where your degree would be useful:

  • Newspaper journalist - researches and writes stories for publication in local, regional and national press
  • Advertising account executive - works in advertising or multi-service agencies, acting as a link between the clients and the agency. Has overall responsibility for the smooth running of a campaign, coordinating the activities of the advertising and administrative teams.
  • Advertising copywriter - usually works in a creative partnership with an art director to conceive, develop and produce effective advertisements.
  • Arts administrator - plans and organises events run by a wide range of arts and cultural organisations.
  • Academic librarian, information officer, records manager - responsible for the acquisition, organisation and dissemination of information and materials within the library system or information unit.
  • Charity officer - has responsibility for aspects of marketing, public relations, organising events and finance within charitable organisations.
  • Marketing executive - develops marketing campaigns that promote a product, service or idea. The role includes planning, advertising, public relations, organising events, product development, distribution, sponsorship and research.
  • Programme researcher, broadcasting/film/video - provides support to the producer and production team. Contributes ideas for programmes, sources contacts and contributors and collects, verifies and prepares information for film, television and radio productions.
  • Public relations officer - uses all forms of media and communication to build, maintain and manage the reputation of companies and organisations.
  • Runner, broadcasting/film/video - fetches, carries and does any small jobs needed for the production department of a film, video or television company. This is an entry-level role.

Many of our students publish and win prizes. In recent years students have gone on to publish novels, poetry collections, win prizes in major competitions such as the Bridport Prize and have poems and stories in magazines such as The Paris Review and Staple.

Students have also had work broadcast on BBC Radio 4.

Graduates from this subject area are highly valued by employers for their problem solving and exceptional communication skills.

As well as or in addition to writing, careers paths include:

  • Teaching (after taking a PGCE)
  • Teaching English as a foreign language
  • Publishing
  • Journalism
  • Arts event management
  • University administration
  • Heritage and tourism
  • Working with charities
  • Graphic design

Work placements

We run a series of competitive, paid internships for graduates. We’ve had internships at Penguin, Myriad Editions, Chawton House Library, a research centre for 18th century women’s writing, and the international journal Short Fiction in Theory and Practice.

You will also have the opportunity to take our Writing Placement Module. This allows you to gain experience in, for example, a workplace such as a local newspaper or as a writer-in-residence. You will then use the skills you have learnt on your course in order to reflect critically on the world of work.

Indicative modules

Year 1

  • Investigating the World
  • Activating the Imagination
  • Writing the Notebook
  • Introduction to Writing Poetry
  • Introduction to Writing Prose
  • Life Writing 1
  • Literary History: The Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries

Year 2

  • Writing Poetry
  • Writing the Short Story
  • Radio Drama
  • Writing for the Stage
  • Writing for tv
  • Life Writing 2
  • Children’s Writing
  • Genre Study: Poetry
  • Genre Study: Prose

Year 3

  • Writing Place and Environment                     
  • Writing Placement
  • Advanced Poetry                                           
  • Publishing, Production and Performance
  • Short Story                                                    
  • Digital Writing
  • Flash Fiction                                                  
  • YA fiction
  • Writing the Novel
  • Fantasy writing
  • Writing for the Stage
  • Writing for the Screen

Teaching and assessment

You will be taught in a variety of ways. Our aim is to give you the tools you need to become an autonomous writer. We do this by helping you find out what it is you want to say and by giving you a thorough grounding in a variety of genres. Much of our teaching is in small groups, where you will discuss models of good writing as well as workshopping your own writing. Tutors are also available to see students individually.

All creative writing courses are assessed through portfolios of work. The critical courses you take alongside your creative courses will be assessed in a variety of ways including essays, exams and presentations. The Writing Placement module will be assessed through a reflective report.

Modules are assessed at every stage of the course, offering cumulative assessment of your progress. Your academic advisor and lecturers are available for advice throughout your degree.

Additional Costs

Include Additional Costs: