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BA (Hons) Politics and Philosophy & Ethics

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Institution C58

UCAS LV25

Bishop Otter campus (Chichester)

3 Years Full Time

Entry Requirements and Fees

2020/21 UK fee: £9,250

2020/21 International fee: £13,500

For further details about fees, please see our Tuition Fee page

 

Typical Offer (individual offers may vary):

  • UCAS Tariff points: 104 - 120 (A levels or combination with AS / EPQ / BTEC / Cambridge Technical)
  • A levels: BBB - BCC
  • Access to HE Diploma: Pass 
  • International Baccalaureate: 28 points 
  • IELTS 6.0 overall with no element lower than 5.5

Student view

Jonathan Pugh
Politics & Contemporary History student
I like studying Politics as a joint degree at Chichester because combining the two adds new dimensions to my understanding of both, and the relatively small classrooms allows for a more personal academic experience.

Course content

You will explore questions of social justice, bio-ethics, and the nature of truth from different historical and contemporary philosophical perspectives. You will also be introduced to contemporary political issues, from political economy to security studies, and have developed the analytical skills and research abilities that will serve you well in the world of work. By the end of this degree, you will be an authority in the complex and complementary relationship between Politics, Philosophy and Ethics.

This three-year course (full-time) is structured around four thematic strands of study: British Politics, International Politics, Defence and Security, Political Thought and Practice. You will receive a solid grounding in the theoretical approaches and research methods in Politics, and will have the opportunity to complete an individual research project under the personal supervision of experienced researchers. 

The course is designed to develop both your transferable skills and subject specific knowledge. You will learn, through the tutorial experience, to read and study key texts in detail, to think critically and analytically about important ideas and issues, and to write knowledgeably and attractively about questions which matter to you and to society. You will also learn about philosophical and ethical ideas.

Our facilities

Over the past few years, we’ve redeveloped both of our campuses so that you have the best facilities available for your degree. We pride ourselves on the quality of the learning environment we can offer our students. We offer a substantial collection of books, journals and other materials to help you further your research. A range of study areas for group and quiet study including Wi-Fi areas for laptop use are available, or you can use our open access PC and Mac areas.

Our Learning Resource Centre is the hub of the learning environment. It has two upper floors of library resources, one for silent study and one for quiet study, both of which have recently been refurbished. On the ground floor, you’ll find the Support and Information Zone, Media Centre, Otter Gallery, Costa Coffee and a variety of IT resources. It also offers:

  • 130 open access PC workstations
  • 45 Apple iMacs
  • Ample printing facilities
  • Netbooks available on loan
  • Professional editing suites
  • Media loans counter
  • Wi-Fi and plug points throughout

Where this can take you

This degree’s specialist focus on Politics, both from a real world and an academic perspective, is particularly useful for careers in the Civil Service, International Organisations, Non-Governmental Organisations, Defence and Security, Public Administration, Law and Business, as well as for postgraduate research.

We pay an enormous amount of attention to your future career choices. In an ever increasing range of work contexts ethical, philosophical and religious knowledge is a highly prized asset.

Ranging from HR departments which need to know about ethical diversity and equality to the media which must understand religious opinions and ethical commitments to the well-known shortage of RE teachers in schools there is a great demand for our graduates.

Our aim is to match your interests and skills to the right career. Our graduates go on to a variety of careers in: Teaching (primary and secondary); Youth Work; Publishing; Community work; Police service; Health care & nursing and Journalism.

Work placements

We offer placement modules so that you can gain vital experience in the workplace.

There are two placement modules – the schools placement for those interested in a career in teaching and the work placement for those choosing other professions. Students find the placement modules stimulating and invaluable when it comes to finding high-quality employment after university.

We understand the importance of ensuring that you have the knowledge, skills and experience to compete successfully in today’s challenging jobs market. As such, we offer an extensive range of study abroad opportunities.

You will have the chance to take one semester of your Politics programme outside of the UK. Our long-term associations with university partners in Europe, the USA, and Canada mean that we’re well placed to offer you a further international dimension to your undergraduate experience.

Indicative modules

Year 1 examines in detail the place of philosophy and ethics in the contemporary world. You study the ideas of the new atheists, such as Richard Dawkins, ethical issues such as how to live a good life, as well as the interaction between religion, ethics and contemporary culture.

Modules may include:

Introduction to Politics

The module examines the nature of politics, as well as the approaches, methods and theories that are encompassed in and constitute the discipline of Politics. Students will first learn to question what can be considered political, the more or less restrictive boundaries of politics, and whether Politics can be considered a science or not. Then, in order to acquire the analytical tools to study politics, the focus will be on political concepts, such as the state, political power, democracy and the related issues of freedom and justice. This is complemented by the study of political ideologies in historical perspective, ranging from ‘traditional ideologies’ like socialism and conservatism, to ‘contemporary ideologies’ like feminism and religious fundamentalism. Finally, while the students will be exposed to and touch upon a variety of methods, they will also be introduced to the method of comparative politics, with a focus on institutions, processes, the legal foundations of the state, legislation, governance, electoral politics, and civil society.

British Politics

The module offers an introduction to British politics. The course will look at the theory and practice of how British political life is shaped. The constitution will be the starting point for study. Students will then examine the structure of Parliament and Cabinet, as well as the role of Prime Minister. The way in which devolution has impacted on British politics will be examined as will the complexities of the relationship which exists between Britain and the institutions of the European Union. There will be the opportunity to assess the relationship between the media and politics, as well as the impact that this has on elections and voting patterns. Students will be encouraged to think about political and historical trends which have impacted on these features of the British landscape. Detailed analysis of the work of key commentators will enable students to evaluate the arguments which shape our understanding of the institutions of the state. This module is a valuable introduction to level 5 and level 6 specialist modules devoted to contemporary history and politics.

International Relations

The module surveys the major theories about the nature and impact on international affairs of institutions and organisations, with a particular emphasis on regime theory and the concept of interdependence. It also explores the empirical aspects of the role of regional and international organizations in global politics, including, amongst other things, their impact on the practice of international cooperation and conflict, the maintenance of international peace and security, the management of international economic relations, the promotion of international environmental standards, the prosecution of international crimes, and related matters of concern to the international community. With a view to preparing students for the ‘Study Visit’ module, the final part of the module considers the working of the UN, EU and NATO, discussing their institutional make-up, interactions, and debates about reforming to remain fit for purpose in the rapidly changing global order.

Nationalism

Regionalism in Modern Europe

Modern British History

The module will be organised around three inter-related themes: (i) the changing nature of the modern (welfarist) and interventionist (mixed economy) state, (ii) the shifting power relationship between majority and minority cultures, and (iii) the notion of the nation, national identity and 'Britishness' both internally (in the United Kingdom and Ireland) and internationally (in relation to Europe, the commonwealth and notions of Empire) in a period of rapidly changing global redefinitions and reorganisations.

Africa and the African Diaspora

The module is divided into four sections in order to explore four key areas in which Africa and the African Diaspora have played a major role in the making of the modern world. Section one examines the consequences of trans-Atlantic slavery for Africa and the modern world and the impact of the Haitian Revolution. Section two examines the consequences of colonialism in Africa. This section also focuses both on the ideologies of racism that accompanied slavery and colonial rule and presents an introduction to Pan-Africanism as an example of an ideological form of resistance and affirmation. Section three focuses on slavery and its consequences in the United States, including the emergence of the Civil Rights and Black Power movements in the period following World War Two. The final section focuses on post-war Britain and in particular the impact of mass migration from the Caribbean. It aims to introduce students not only to the demographic and political consequences of post-war migration but also and to the varied strategies of affirmation and resistance employed by Britain’s new Caribbean population.

Contemporary Europe

Thatcherism and Afterwards

The course will provide a historical context to the governments of Mrs Margaret Thatcher, PM, and subsequent administrations that have continued to be influenced by her actions and political ideology. It will also unpack the meaning of the term 'Thatcherism' and situate this political belief system in comparison with other forms of Conservatism. Key themes to be addressed will include the political climate of the 1970s that gave British Conservatism a theatre of operations out of which to mount a series of electoral victories; discussion of Thatcherism's economic policy and practice; and the significance of Thatcherism for the wider popular culture at it's high point (circa 1987). In addition, it will track the changing shift in Thatcher's and her supporters' attitudes and policies towards the development of the European Union. This will include discussion of Mrs Thatcher's own shift in perceptions from Europhile to Eurosceptic, and the noting of the importance of foreign policy as a vector for complaint and the disillusionment of non-Thatcherite conservative politicians and actors (for example, Michael Heseltine and Lord Howe). It will also discuss how Thatcherism thrived on a polarized world view that divided the political space into allies and enemies. The cultural impact of Thatcherism will be analysed - notably underlining how it was as much through the 'arts' that a left critique of Thatcherism, picking up and developing this aspect which will have been signalled in the majority of preceding sub-sections.

 

In year 2 you can develop your specialist interests by studying modules in ethics, such as bio-ethics or major ethical thinkers, as well as philosophical issues and questions. You also have the chance to undertake a work or schools placement in year 2.

Modules may include:

Cool Britannia: post-war British culture

For the purposes of this module the word 'culture' is understood through the common, restricted and classical definition that is widely used by non-Marxist scholars across Western Europe. That is to say, culture is taken to mean literary, filmic, or other artistic forms or schools of practice. This definition does not preclude a political analysis of cultural life, it simply removes the reductionism of seeing all culture as being 'ideological' or crudely power related. However, the definition does tend to imply a focus on elite and middlebrow works rather than the more amorphous range of sources often discussed with reference to 'popular culture'. Thus, issues relating to sport, social life, leisure, eating, drinking or other popular social customs are not explored in the module. Nevertheless, the problematic questions of 'what is culture?'; or 'is culture elitist or subject to mass appeal?' will inevitably form an important sub-text to the module as a whole. In the light of this definition of culture, a representative sample of cultural production as conducted in Britain after 1945 will be explored in a broadly chronological fashion from the 1940s to the 1990s. Dominant movements will be selected for detailed analysis. These will include 'The Angry Young Men'; the '1960s'; 'British New Wave Cinema'; 'Culture and the Cold War'; 'Thatcherism and Responses to Thatcherism'. As is often the case, the terms that are used to describe these artistic-cultural movements are themselves associated with particular sub-periods of the post-war decades. These snapshots of time/cultural production form the main content of the course. They represent a sample of some of the major forms of literary-cultural activity witnessed in Britain since 1945.

Fascist Ideology

Fascism will be studied in terms of its implementation, but also in terms of resistance to its message. By looking at a variety of case studies (Italy, Germany, France, Britain, Spain and Portugal), we will discuss the way in which the ideology was embraced and fought against. By looking at fascism as a flexible ideology and the inspiration for varied political movements, the modules will consider its broad influence on European history. Fascism is often confined to the 1930s and 1940s, though this module will look at the surprising persistence of fascist ideology in new forms after the defeat of Nazi Germany and Fascist Italy. Looking at literary and cultural forms of post-fascism will help to demonstrate how many of the core messages of ideological fascism survived despite being politically discredited. This, in turn, will help to show how the core values and ideologies of fascisms were rekindled in the new wave of Populist Nativist politics in Europe. The module will be delivered through a combination of lectures and seminars. A wide combination of historical sources (primary and secondary) will be used to deepen students’ knowledge of the ideology, and of its varied forms. Seminar discussion will give students confidence to speak on the topic prior to their formative assessment – a group presentation. This activity will help students focus on areas for revision to assist in their summative assessment.

The USA

Politics and Teaching

African Diaspora in Modern Britain

The module is divided into four sections in order to explore four key areas in which Africa and the African Diaspora have played a major role in the making of the modern world. Section one examines the consequences of trans-Atlantic slavery for Africa and the modern world and the impact of the Haitian Revolution. Section two examines the consequences of colonialism in Africa. This section also focuses both on the ideologies of racism that accompanied slavery and colonial rule and presents an introduction to Pan-Africanism as an example of an ideological form of resistance and affirmation. Section three focuses on slavery and its consequences in the United States, including the emergence of the Civil Rights and Black Power movements in the period following World War Two. The final section focuses on post-war Britain and in particular the impact of mass migration from the Caribbean. It aims to introduce students not only to the demographic and political consequences of post-war migration but also and to the varied strategies of affirmation and resistance employed by Britain’s new Caribbean population.

Colonialism and Anti-Colonialism

The module begins with a survey of Africa in the nineteenth century to demonstrate that despite the impact and upheaval of the trans-Atlantic slave trade and various encroachments by the representatives of the European powers, Africans were still the key makers in their own history. It examines the factors leading to the scramble for and partition of Africa as well as African resistance to colonial conquest. The defeat of Italy by the Ethiopian empire is used as a case study to examine the reasons why most pre-colonial African states were unable to withstand European conquest. The module details the nature and extent of colonial rule and early examples of African nationalism and anti-colonial activity, which culminated in opposition to the Italian invasion of Ethiopia in 1935. Students are encouraged to consider the impact of World War 2 on the growth of anti-colonial nationalism and the extent to which the end of colonial rule was brought about by the actions of anti-colonial activity in Africa rather than simply as a result of changes in the policies of the colonial powers. The module concludes by assessing the impact of colonial rule, considering the nature of neo-colonialism. Ethiopia is again used as a case study to examine how armed struggle was widely employed during the period of the Cold War to achieve national liberation.

Contemporary Security Studies

Political Ideology and Political Ideas

Study Visits (Brussels and/or Geneva)

Political Organisation: systems of Governance

 

In your final year you undertake a dissertation in a subject of your choice alongside further specialist modules in philosophy and ethics. Students are offered excellent choice and high quality specialist teaching.

Modules may include:

Dissertation

The dissertation constitutes three modules at level 6. It will sustain a positioned argument (thesis) over 10,500 words. Building on either the Research in Politics or the Approaches to Research module, or both, students will undertake a dissertation in Politics, Contemporary History, or Politics and Contemporary History. On completion of these level 5 modules, students will have identified their dissertation subject, which will be approved by the tutor of this module for viability and appropriateness. The dissertational work will include, in the case of a dissertation in Contemporary History, methodological and historiographical dimensions and, where appropriate, integrate theoretical discussions; in the case of a dissertation in Politics, refer to specific political science approaches, theories, and methods; and in the case of a dissertation in Politics and Contemporary History, make combined use of historical and political science approaches, methods, and theories.

Human Rights

Eur-African Security

Pan-Africanism

The module aims to build on the work undertaken by students in other modules in this subject area by providing an in depth focus on ideologies, political movements and key activists concerned with the political unity and liberation of Africa and the African diaspora. It traces the evolution of Pan-African ideologies and movements from the nineteenth century onwards and considers why they emerged and what political problems they were addressing. Examples are drawn from the African continent, the United States, Europe and the Caribbean and although mainly focusing on political manifestations of Pan-Africanism the module also considers the role and influence of cultural manifestations such as the Harlem Renaissance and Négritude. In particular the module allows students to analyse the significance of the ideas of key ideologists an activists including Edward Blyden, Marcus Garvey, George Padmore, W.E.B. Du Bois, Aimé Césaire, Malcolm X, Kwame Nkrumah, Franz Fanon and Amilcar Cabral. Students are encouraged to undertake their own research projects in order to examine particular aspects of Pan-Africanism and the influence and legacy of key activists.

The City in the Twentieth Century

New York: Making and American City

Post-War Europe

Political Economy

Law and Politics

International English Studies

Include International English Studies: 

Teaching and assessment

At our University, you will find a friendly atmosphere and an encouraging team of staff which will work hard to support you throughout your learning.

During your time with us, you will be challenged to develop your intellectual and practical skills and guided by a team of experienced and well-qualified teaching staff.

All of our tutors have recognised national and international research expertise and a passion for their respective subject areas, which means you will be studying at the cutting edge of the most recent developments in knowledge.

Students can also gain credits from attending seminars and lectures from guest speakers including nationally-recognized journalists, policy makers, politicians and international academics.

Additional Costs

Include Additional Costs: 

Additional Costs