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Health communication and behaviour change lab

Dr Susan Churchill
s.churchill@chi.ac.uk

Research in this lab focuses on:

  • understanding the antecedents of health-related behaviour
  • encouraging people to be more accepting of health promotion campaigns
  • personality as a  moderator in the relationship between persuasive health messages and behaviour change
  • prescriptive morality (e.g., relating to things that we should do) and proscriptive morality (e.g., relating to things we shouldn’t do)

Current projects and available participation opportunities 

  • Testing the effects of self-affirmation and prescriptive vs. proscriptive message framing in predicting motivational and behavioural outcomes relating to alcohol consumption.
  • Encouraging healthy diet in adolescence: the effects of message framing, message format (statistical vs. narrative), and impulsivity
  • The role of message framing and message format in influencing diabetes foot care behaviour
  •  The role that self-affirmation may play in reducing young females’ concerns about STEM stereotypes

Some recent past projects

  • The effects of proscriptive vs. prescriptive health recommendations to drink alcohol within recommended limits on moral norms, reactance, attitudes, intentions, and behaviour change
  • The effects of proscriptive vs. prescriptive injunctions to reduce meat consumption on cognitive antecedents of behaviour and subsequent behaviour
  • The effects of self-affirmation on health cognition and health behaviour

Any other member(s) involved including faculty, PhD students, research volunteers

 

  • Sophie Goodwin
  • Mattthew Reaney
  • Joanna Slodkowska-Barabasz

Recent publications

Churchill, S., Jessop, D. C., Green, R., & Harris, P. R. (2018). Self-affirmation improves self-control over snacking among participants low in eating self-efficacy. Appetite, 123, 264-268. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.appet.2017.12.028

Reaney, M., Chmiel, N., & Churchill, S. (2018). Foot care, ‘spousal’ support and type 2 diabetes: an exploratory qualitative study. Psychology & Health, 1-17.

Pavey, L. J., Sparks, P. & Churchill, S. (2018) Proscriptive vs. prescriptive health recommendations to drink alcohol within recommended limits: effects on moral norms, reactance, attitudes, intentions, and behaviour change. Alcohol and Alcoholism. ISSN 0735-0414

Churchill, S., Jessop, D. C., Goodwin, S., Ritchie, L., & Harris, P. R. (2018). Self-affirmation improves music performance among performers high on the impulsivity dimension of sensation seeking. Psychology of Music, 0305735617705007.

Pavey, L., & Churchill, S. (2017). Impulsivity and temporal frame: Reducing frequency of snacking by highlighting immediate health benefits. Eating Behaviors. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.eatbeh.2017.01.004

Churchill, S., Pavey, L., Jessop, D., & Sparks, P. (2016). Persuading People to Drink Less Alcohol: The Role of Message Framing, Temporal Focus and Autonomy. Alcohol and Alcoholism. 51(6):727-733

Churchill, S., Good, A., & Pavey, L. (2014). Promoting the avoidance of high-calorie snacks: the effects of temporal message framing and eating self-efficacy. Appetite, 80, 131-136.