Postgraduate Open Evening

Achieving Inclusivity and Diversity In and Through Sport

 

Researchers in this theme explore how inclusivity and diversity can be achieved in and through sport. The principle focus of the researchers in this theme is gender equity in sports leadership. The core membership of the theme includes members of staff associated with the Anita White Foundation (AWF). The AWF educates, empowers and invests in female leaders and scholars in sport, preserves heritage of the women and sport movement, conducts and facilitates impactful research and champions gender equity in sports leadership. Its flagship programme, the Women’s Sport Leadership Academy (WSLA) was shortlisted for a Beyond Sport Award for Gender Equality. Research in this theme has, recently, expanded to include research examining safeguarding of children, the use of sport with refugee communities, community and disability sports coaching and research exploring the classification system for blind football.

Interested in finding out more about this research area or getting involved in our research projects? Please email Dr Suzie Everley (s.everley@chi.ac.uk) or Dr Jordan Matthews (jordan.matthews@chi.ac.uk).

Gender equity in sports leadership

 

The (lack of) gender balance within sports leadership has gained increasing traction in the UK. Globally, varying efforts are being attempted by significant sporting organisations. At the University of Chichester, we are particularly interested in the experiences and development of women leaders in sport, sport for development, eSports and how this can contribute to gender equity in sports leadership.

We have explored the topic of women leaders in sport nationally (Piggott et al., 2019), globally (Fasting et al., 2018) and over time (Matthews, 2018). We have a track record of doctoral student completions and are also home to the globally-recognised Women’s Sport Leadership Academy (WSLA).

Interested in finding out more about this research area or getting involved in our research projects? Please email Dr Suzie Everley (s.everley@chi.ac.uk) or Dr Jordan Matthews (jordan.matthews@chi.ac.uk).


Key publications

Fasting, K., Pike, E., Matthews, J., and Sand, T.S. (2018). From Helsinki to Gaborone: IWG Progress Report 2013-2018. Gaborone: IWG.

Pike, E.C.J., White, A., Matthews, J.J.K., Southon, S., and Piggott, L.V. (2018) Women and Sport Leadership: A Case Study of a Development Programme. In Mansfield, L., Caudwell, J., Watson, R. and Wheaton, B (Eds). The Palgrave Handbook of Feminisms in Sport, Leisure and Physical Education. Basingstoke: Palgrave. 809-824.

Piggott, L.V., Pike, E.C.J., and Matthews, J.J.K. (2019) A ‘Sporting Future’ for all?: A Review of Gender Diversity in English Sports Leadership. In Elling, A., Hovden, J., and Knoppers, A. (Eds). Gender Diversity in European Sport Leadership. London: Routledge.

Matthews, J.J.K. (2018) Tensions and future directions for the women and sport movement. In Mansfield, L., Caudwell, J., Watson, R. and Wheaton, B (Eds). The Palgrave Handbook of Feminisms in Sport, Leisure and Physical Education. Basingstoke: Palgrave. 181-199.

Matthews, J.J.K., and Pike, E.C.J. (2016) “What on earth are they doing in a racing car?”: Towards an Understanding of Women in Motorsport. The International Journal of the History of Sport, 33(13), 1532-1550. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09523367.2016.1168811


Key Staff

Dr Suzie Everley

Dr Jordan Matthews

The Science of Women's Football

 

There has been huge growth in the popularity of women’s football from both a research and participation perspective in recent years. The University of Chichester has always had a strong tradition in the women’s game and we were one of the first Universities to be awarded an FA Women’s High-Performance Centre in 2017.

Our research in women’s football has focused on the physical (e.g., Datson et al., 2017) and technical (e.g., Harkness-Armstrong et al., 2020) demands of match performance, fitness test performance (e.g., Bishop et al., 2019) and how testing can inform talent identification processes (e.g., Datson et al., 2019), injury prevention training (e.g., De Ste Croix et al., 2018) and the development activities of elite players (e.g., Ford et al., 2020). In addition to our numerous projects with female players, we have recently undertaken a multi-disciplinary project on the training and development of elite female referees (Datson et al., 2020).

We aim to research topical areas relating to football match performance, as demonstrated by one of our students currently undertaking a PhD entitled ‘interventions to reduce heading load in women’s football.’

Interested in finding out more about this research area or getting involved in our research projects? Please email Naomi Datson (N.Datson@chi.ac.uk)


Key Publications

Bishop, C., Turner, A., Maloney, S., Lake, J., Loturco, I., Bromley, T., & Read, P. (2019). Drop Jump Asymmetry is Associated with Reduced Sprint and Change-of-Direction Speed Performance in Adult Female Soccer Players. Sports, 7(1), 29. https://doi.org/10.3390/sports7010029

Datson, N., Drust, B., Weston, M., Jarman, I. H., Lisboa, P. J., & Gregson, W. (2017). Match Physical Performance of Elite Female Soccer Players during International Competition. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 31(9), 2379–2387. https://doi.org/10.1519/JSC.0000000000001575

Datson, N., Everley, S., Greenlees, I., & Piggott, L. (2020). Tailoring Referee Development for the Women's Game.

Datson, N., Weston, M., Drust, B., Gregson, W., & Lolli, L. (2019). High-intensity endurance capacity assessment as a tool for talent identification in elite youth female soccer. Journal of Sports Sciences. https://doi.org/10.1080/02640414.2019.1656323

De Ste Croix, M., Hughes, J., Ayala, F., Taylor, L., & Datson, N. (2018). Efficacy of Injury Prevention Training Is Greater for High-Risk vs Low-Risk Elite Female Youth Soccer Players. American Journal of Sports Medicine, 46(13), 3271–3280. https://doi.org/10.1177/0363546518795677

Ford, P. R., Hodges, N. J., Broadbent, D., O’Connor, D., Scott, D., Datson, N., Andersson, H. A., & Williams, A. M. (2020). The developmental and professional activities of female international soccer players from five high-performing nations. Journal of Sports Sciences, 1–9. https://doi.org/10.1080/02640414.2020.1789384

Harkness-Armstrong, A., Till, K., Datson, N., & Emmonds, S. (2020). Technical characteristics of elite youth female soccer match-play: position and age group comparisons between under 14 and under 16 age groups. International Journal of Performance Analysis in Sport, 20(6), 942–959. https://doi.org/10.1080/24748668.2020.1820173

Children’s experiences of health and wellbeing

 

Sport and physical activity has long been considered to be a powerful factor in promoting childhood health and well-being. Our researchers are interested in how and when physical activity, sport and physical education experiences can promote such well-being changes and how we can better promote health and well-being through physical activity.

Two key strands can be seen in our research activity. First, we examine the factors that influence a child’s experience of physical activity (whether through formal coaching, teaching or play). In particular we examine how sociocultural factors (class, power dynamics, culture) shape the experience and impact of being physical active. In this line of research, we are particularly keen on exploring research methods (e.g., drawing, photography) that allow us to more fully access the child’s voice and subjective experiences. Second, our research examines the potential short and long-term health benefits of physical activity in children. In this strand, we have explored the efficacy of schemes such as the daily mile on physical activity participation, attitudes to physical activity and physical fitness. We have also evaluated exercise schemes designed to promote activity within obese populations.

Interested in finding out more about this research area or getting involved in our research projects? Please email Suzanne Everley (s.everley@chi.ac.uk).


KEY PUBLICATIONS

Everley, S. (In press) ‘Physical Literacy and the development of Girls’ Leadership: An Evaluation of the FA’s Active Literacy Through Storytelling Programme’ Education 3-13.

Everley, S. (2019 ) ‘Using visual research tools when working tools with children in a primary school setting’, Chapter 5, pp55-70,  in Researching Difference in Sport and Physical Activity,  Medcalfe, R. and Mackintosh, C. (Eds) Routledge.

Everley, S. (2020) The Child Protection in Sport Unit - Supporting National Governing Bodies in Hearing the Voices of Children: An Evaluation of Current Practice. Child Abuse Review, 29 (2). 114-129. ISSN 0952-9136

Everley, S. (2019) ‘Understanding Gendered Physical Activity of Children: Challenging binaried representation in school based research’  Education 3-13, 48:2,  226-238. https://doi.org/10.1080/03004279.2019.1605399

Everley, S. and Everley, K. (2018) Primary School Children’s Experiences of Physical Activity: The place of social and cultural capital in participation and implications for schools’  Early Childhood Development and Care  189:2, 2032-2042 https://doi.org/10.1080/03004430.2018.1431231

Everley, S and Macfadyen, T (2015) ‘I like playing on my trampoline; it makes me feel alive’ : Valuing Physical Activity: Perceptions and Meanings for Children and Implications for Primary Schools’ Education 3-13,  45:2. 1-25. DOI10.1080/03004279.2015.1069367

Sims, J., Scarborough, P. and Foster, C. (2015) ‘The effectiveness of interventions on sustained childhood physical activity: a systematic review and meta-analysis of controlled studies’ PLoS ONE e0132935 doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0132935

Publications in Conference Proceedings:

Everley, S. and Potter, J. (2016) ‘’Do 'Sporting' Agendas Limit Primary School Aged Girls' Physical Activity?’ Special Issue: Abstracts of the 13th International Congress on Obesity, 17:2  1-248

Everley, S. and Potter, J. (2016) ‘Primary School Aged Boys And Physical Activity In School Environments: Subjective Experiences And The Place Of 'Sport' In Social Identity’, Special Issue: Abstracts of the 13th International Congress on Obesity, 17:2. 1-248

Potter, J and Everley, S (2015) ‘Participation in Physical Activity and PE In UK Primary Schools’ in Obesity Facts, The European Journal of Obesity 8:1  1-272

Conference presentations

Everley, S.C and Everley, K (2017) ‘Children’s experiences of physical activity: implications for primary schools’, Presented to the British Educational Research Association’s Annual Conference, University of Sussex, Nominated for an Award for Best Paper within the PE and Sport Pedagogy SIG.

Gault, M.L., Potter, J., Lauder M. (2018). Effects of the daily mile on measure of physical fitness in 9-10 year olds.European College of Sport and Exercise Sciences Annual Conference. Dublin, Ireland.

Lauder, M., Potter, J., Gault, M.L. (2018). The intra-reliability of a physical fitness test battery in 9-10 year olds. European College of Sport and Exercise Sciences Annual Conference. Dublin, Ireland.

Potter, Gault, M.L., Lauder M. (2018). The impact of running a mile-a-day in school on attitudes to physical activity. European Congress on Obesity.


KEY STAFF