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Dr Sarah Edmunds

Senior Lecturer in Exercise Psychology

Sarah is an HCPC registered Sport and Exercise Psychologist and a Chartered scientist with the British Psychological Society.

Her research interests include: promoting physical activity in the workplace; qualitative studies to explore physical activity behaviour; physical activity and well-being; and physical activity and diabetes.

She is joint editor of the book ‘Physical Activity and Mental Health’ which was published in 2014, and has published peer reviewed publications in the areas of exercise psychology and pedagogical research methods.

Sarah regularly reviews for a number of journals and grant awarding bodies.

Prior to working at the University of Chichester Sarah worked as a Research Fellow and Visiting Lecturer at the University of Westminster (2008-2013) and as a Senior Lecturer in Exercise and Sport Psychology at St Mary’s University College (2003-2008), she completed her PhD at Liverpool John Moores University.

Professional

Education

  • PhD Exercise Psychology ‘The psychological and physiological effects of physical activity and fitness for children with type 1 diabetes’. Liverpool John Moores University, 2003.
  • BSc (Hons) Psychology, University of Sheffield, 1996
  • Postgraduate Certificate in Teaching and Learning in Higher Education, St Mary’s University College, 2006
  • Postgraduate Certificate in Counselling and Psychotherapy, University of East London, 2013

Professional memberships:

  • British Psychological Society, Chartered Member
  • BPS Division of Sport and Exercise Psychology, full member
  • Health and Care Professions Council, Registered Sport and Exercise Psychologist
  • Higher Education Academy, Fellow

Teaching

MSCBPS01/MSSDPS01 Psychology of Exercise and Health

The aim of the module is to further students’ knowledge of the psychological, social and environmental influences upon physical activity and the consequences of activity upon psychological health and well-being of the individual. The module will see to critically evaluate current theoretical and research issues in exercise psychology and apply these issues to the work of exercise psychologists and health professionals.

SPL341 Managing the Research Process in Sport and Exercise Psychology

 Aims: The process of conducting research involves a range of skills including project management, ethical approval, data handling and the presentation of results to various audiences. The aim therefore of this module is to provide students with the opportunity to learn and develop a range of skills required in the process of conducting research. Students will learn about the philosophical underpinnings of psychological enquiry, ethical considerations for conducting psychology research projects, methods for conducting a critical appraisal of the research literature and criteria for judging research quality. At the end of the module students will showcase their own individual research in a conference through a poster presentation and oral defence.

SPL332 Exercise and Physical Activity Interventions

Aims: Physical inactivity is recognised as a key predictor of a range of adverse health and social outcomes.  Increasing activity levels in the general population is now a priority of government and opportunities for activity professionals are increasing.  This module builds upon the core knowledge of exercise psychology gained in SPL205 Psychology of Physical Activity and Health.  Students will integrate a complex knowledge base derived from sport and exercise, health and mainstream psychology as well as the discipline of health promotion to provide a theoretical underpinning to the professional practice of activity promotion and intervention

SPL300 Independent Project

Aims: The independent project provides an opportunity to apply appropriate knowledge, concepts, techniques and research methods of Sport and Exercise Sciences to an in-depth study of a particular question or problem related to sport, exercise or sports therapy. This module aims to foster a greater understanding of the processes to undertake a small scale research project, and marks the culmination of the students learning experience. The study will enable the student to produce a written research report.

SPL205 Psychology of Physical Activity and Health

The discipline of exercise psychology is concerned with the application of psychological principles to the context of physical activity and health related quality of life.  This module will seek to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the psychological theories applied to the contexts of physical activity and health and to evaluate the positive and negative psychological effects of participation in activities.

SPL 121 Principles of Psychology

Psychologists are interested in the study of human behaviour and with understanding why we act in the way that we do. Why do some people commit acts of selflessness whilst others commit acts of violence? Why do some people live healthily and others engage in behaviours that lead to an early grave? Why are some people happy and content whilst others suffer from depression, daily anxiety and low levels of self-esteem? Why do some people excel under pressure whilst others choke in the face of stress? These are just some of the questions that psychologists are interested in because by answering them we may be able to help people to behave in ways that help them become happy, productive and healthy. However, there are many views concerning why we behave in the way we do and debates continue to this day. The aim of this module is to provide you with an introduction to some of the main perspectives on the psychology of human behaviour and some of the key views on why we behave the way we do.

Committees/Administrative roles

  • Student Transition Enhancement Programme Academic Tutor
  • Joint lead for CCASES Physical Activity Interventions theme
  • Ethics sub-committee member

Publications

Publications

  • Cartwright, T., Fraser, E., Edmunds, S., Wilkinson, N. and Jacobs K. (2014) Journeys of adjustment: the experiences of adolescents living with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis. Child: Care, Health and Development. doi: 10.1111/cch.12206
  • Brown G. and Edmunds S. (2014) Undertaking pedagogic research using quantitative methods. In: Getting Started in Pedagogic Research within the STEM Disciplines (pp. 13-20). University of Birmingham STEM Education Centre on behalf of the National HE STEM Programme, Birmingham. 
  • Clow A. and Edmunds S. (2014) Physical Activity and Mental Health. Champaign IL: Human Kinetics.
  • Edmunds S. and Clow A. (2014) Physical activity and mental health in long term conditions. In Clow A and Edmunds S. (Eds) Physical Activity and Mental Health. Champaign IL: Human Kinetics.
  • Clow A. and Edmunds  S. (2014) Pathways linking physical activity to well-being and mental health. In Clow A and Edmunds S. (Eds) Physical Activity and Mental Health. Champaign IL: Human Kinetics.
  • Brown G. and Edmunds S. (2013) Lectures. In J. Dent and R. Harden (eds) A Practical Guide for Medical Teachers 4th Edition. Edinburgh: Elsevier
  • Edmunds S. and Brown G. (2013) Undertaking pedagogic research using qualitative methods. In: M.Grove and T. Overton (Eds.) Getting Started in Pedagogic Research within the STEM Disciplines (pp. 21-28). University of Birmingham STEM Education Centre on behalf of the National HE STEM Programme, Birmingham.  
  • Edmunds S., Hurst L. and Harvey K. (2013) Physical activity barriers in the workplace: An exploration of factors contributing to non-participation in a UK workplace physical activity intervention. International Journal of Workplace Health Management. 6.3.227-240
  • Edmunds S., Stephenson D. and Clow A. (2013) The effects of a physical activity intervention on employees in small and medium enterprises: a mixed methods study. WORK: A Journal of Prevention, Assessment & Rehabilitation, 46, 39–49..
  • Edmunds S. and Brown G. (2012) Doing qualitative research in dentistry and dental education. European Journal of Dental Education, 16, 110–117.
  • Brown G. and Edmunds S. (2011) Doing Pedagogical Research in Engineering. Engineering Centre for Excellence in Teaching and Learning: Loughborough University.
  • Edmunds S. and Brown G. (2010) Effective Small Group Learning: AMEE Guide No. 48. Medical Teacher, 32, 715-726.
  • Edmunds S. and Brown G. (2010) AMEE Guide 48: Effective Small Group Learning. Dundee: Association for Medical Education in Europe.
  • Edmunds S. (2010) Wellbeing: conceptual issues and implications for interdisciplinary work. Journal of Holistic Healthcare, 7, 9-12.
  • Edmunds S., Roche D. and Stratton G. (2010) Levels and patterns of physical activity in children and adolescents with Type 1 diabetes and associated metabolic and physiologic health outcomes. Journal of Physical Activity and Health, 7, 68-77.
  • Brown G. and Edmunds S. (2009) Learning from Lectures. In J. Dent and R. Harden (eds) A Practical Guide for Medical Teachers 3rd Edition. Edinburgh: Elsevier.
  • Roche D.M., Edmunds S., Cable T., Didi M. and Stratton G. (2008) Skin microvascular reactivity in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes in relation to levels of physical activity and aerobic fitness. Pediatric Exercise Science, 20, 426-438.
  • Edmunds S., Roche D., Stratton G., Wallymahmed A. and Glenn S. (2007) Physical activity and psychological well-being in children with Type 1 diabetes. Psychology, Health and Medicine Journal, 12, 353-363.
  • Edmunds S., Garratt A., Haines L. and Blair M. (2005) Child health assessment at school entry (CHASE) project: evaluation in 10 London primary schools. Child: Health, Care and Development, 31, 143-154.
  • Edmunds S., Haines L. and Blair M. (2005) Development of a questionnaire to collect public health data for school entrants in London: Child Health Assessment at School Entry (CHASE) project. Child: Health, Care and Development, 31, 89-97.

Recent Conference Presentations

  • Edmunds S., Sitch M. and Lowry R. (2015) An exploration of the types and sources of social support for physical activity that are provided and received in an office based workplace. To be presented at the International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, June 2015, Edinburgh.
  • Lowry R., Sitch M. and Edmunds S. (2015) Who do you turn to? Mapping employee social support for physical activity in an office-based workforce. International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, June 2015, Edinburgh.
  • Sitch M., Lowry R., Edmunds S. and Day M. (2015) An exploration of the structure of personal social networks and physical activity level. International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, June 2015, Edinburgh.
  • Edmunds S. and Clow A. (2012) The effects of a physical activity intervention on employees in small and medium enterprises: a mixed methods study. British Psychological Society Annual Conference, London.
  • Edmunds S. and Stephenson D. (2010) ‘Workplace Activator’: a pilot programme to engage small and medium sized enterprises in physical activity promotion. London Health 2010, London.

Public engagement:

Media activity

  • Interview about physical activity and wellbeing on BBC Radio Scotland, MacAulay and Co. (15/05/2013)
  • Careers in Sport and Exercise Psychology Talk for BPS London and Home Counties Branch (2009 & 2010)

Non peer reviewed publications

Funding awarded from external sources:

  • £9,821 from the Greater London Authority. London Workplace Well-being Charter Evaluation Framework (Jan 2013-June 2013). Co-applicant.
  • £85,614 from: the Department of Work and Pensions Challenge Fund (£39,594); NHS Westminster £8,500; NHS Camden £5,000; Central YMCA £32,520 in kind. ‘Workplace Activator’ (April 2010-September 2011). Co-applicant.
  • £38,065 from the Higher Education Innovation Fund ‘Development of interactive lesson plans to promote positive body image in children and adolescents’ (March 2011 – November 2011). Co-applicant, with Central YMCA as partners
  • £90,000 from British Heart Foundation. ‘The use of natural green space to modify psychophysiological responses associated with workplace stress’. Co-applicant with Dr Valerie Gladwell, University of Essex. (September 2010-2013).

Reviewing

Reviewer for a number of peer reviewed journals including: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine; Health Education Research; International Journal of Workplace Health Management; and Academic Medicine.

Research

Interests

Sarah has research interests in the following areas:

  • Promoting physical activity in the workplace
  • Qualitative studies to explore physical activity behaviour
  • Physical activity and well-being
  • Physical activity and diabetes
  • Pedagogical research

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