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BSC (HONS) AND MSCI DANCE SCIENCE

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Institution C58

UCAS W5C6

BSc– 3 years / MSci – 4 years Full Time

Entry Requirements and Fees

2020/21 UK fee: £9,250

2020/21 International fee: £13,500

For further details about fees, please see our Tuition Fee page.

Typical Offer (individual offers may vary):

Tariff points: 96 - 120

A Levels:  BSc (Hons) - BBB - CCC               

                 MSci - BBB

BTEC: BSc (Hons) - DDM - DMM

            MSci - DDD

Applicants will be asked to attend an application event where they will participate in a dance class, an informal interview (normally in pairs), and submit a short written task. 

IELTS 6.0 overall with no element lower than 5.5

Student view

We’re really lucky at Chichester to have the facilities that we do, the dance studios are amazing and the labs too. The staff are incredible at making sure you’re comfortable and happy with what you’re doing and always there for support. The course has a great combination of practice and theory. It’s interesting how we learn something in a physiology lesson and then are able to apply it to technique or performance classes. This transfer of knowledge helps us understand the information from multiple perspectives.

Course content

Our Dance Science degree can be studied as a three years Bachelor of Science with Honours (BSc (Hons) Dance Science) or as a four year integrated Masters of Science (MSci Dance Science)*. This exciting programme will develop your skills and passion for dance, along with your knowledge and understanding of human performance sciences.

Through a combination of core and elective modules, you will study the disciplines of Physiology, Psychology, Biomechanics and Somatic Practices, underpinned by scientific research methodologies. Daily studio practice offers you a physical dance experience whilst theoretical underpinnings are explored via group lectures and workshops. Applied research skills are honed via hands-on laboratory sessions.

Throughout the programme you will have opportunities to perform, to participate in and conduct research, to undertake work placements, and to pursue modules which are aligned with professional qualifications. There are also options to connect your research with the resident student dance companies, 3Fall (undergraduate) and mapdance (postgraduate).

As you progress through your three-year BSc or four-year MSci you will be able to choose a specific pathway of study, enabling you to focus your studies in the area of Applied Performance or Health and Wellbeing. The Applied Performance pathway offers a focus of knowledge and application to dance training and performance contexts, whereas the Health and Wellbeing pathway offers a focus of knowledge and application on the potential benefits of dance for a wide range of diverse populations. Students on the MSci extend their specialism at Master's level embarking upon a significant research dissertation and pursuing modules that focus on professional and applied techniques within dance science.

Successful completion of the programme will result in the relevant knowledge and skills to meet the ever increasing demand for well-qualified Dance Scientists across a range of professional, training, educational, recreational and community-based dance and exercise settings.

KEY FEATURES OF THE PROGRAMME….

  • Our Dance Science Programme can be studied as a three-year BSc (Hons) or a four-year integrated Master's* (MSci). 
  • Daily studio practice, including technique classes (contemporary and ballet) and supplementary training practices (including dance fitness, somatic techniques, contact improvisation);
  • Choice of Applied Performance or Health and Wellbeing pathways, allowing you to focus your studies on a chosen area of application;
  • Module options that link to the profession through placements and pursuit of professional industry training and certifications in dance, exercise and fitness, and dance movement psychotherapy;
  • Access to specialist facilities and staff expertise across Dance and the Institute of Sport; our specialist dance science tutors are internationally renowned for their teaching and research
  • Options to link your research interests with one of our student dance companies 3Fall (undergraduate) and mapdance (postgraduate)
  • The potential to seek employment across a range of professional, training, educational, recreational and community-based dance and exercise settings
  • The opportunity to progress onto a variety of related postgraduate programmes in the areas of Education, Dance, Dance Science, Sports and Exercise Science, Somatics offering a continuity of study and development of chosen specialism at a higher level.
  • Regular performances from visiting dance and theatre companies in the University’s Showroom
  • Links with local, national and international organisations including The Point Eastleigh, One Dance UK, the British Association of Sports and Exercise Sciences (BASES), the International Association for Dance Medicine and Science (IADMS)
  • Links with professional and pre-professional dance companies including: Lîla Dance, Flexer & Sandiland, Ceyda Tanc Dance Company, Tribe Company, AKA Dance Theatre Company and Mapdance.

*Should you choose the four-year MSci Programme you will be eligible for a tuition fee loan for the entire course.

Our facilities

Our Programme is delivered in purpose-built dance studios and fully equipped scientific laboratories. Our students can access equipment and support from our dance technical team, and our sports and exercise science laboratory technicians, along with a range of AV recording and editing equipment accessible from the Learning Resource Centre. 

Dance Facilities

 

  • Four purpose built dance studios
  • A fully-equipped 250-seat theatre
  • A 110-seat studio theatre
  • A newly refurbished large gymnasium space
  • Two workshop spaces in the new Academic Building.  

Sports and Exercise Science Facilities

  • Five dedicated physiology labs
  • Four dedicated psychology labs
  • Two dedicated biomechanics labs
  • An environmental chamber to simulate heat, altitude, etc
  • A sports injury clinic and adjoining rehabilitation space
  • Modern fitness suite
  • Strength and conditioning room
  • Two multi-purpose gymnasiums
  • Indoor and outdoor climbing walls and climbing boulder
  • A range of grass and astro turf pitches
  • Outdoor and indoor netball and tennis courts
  • 110m synthetic athletics track

Our Library offers a substantial collection of books, journals and other materials to help you further your knowledge and research. In the upper two floors there are a number of study areas for group and quiet study including Wi-Fi areas for laptop use are available, or you can use our open access PC and Mac areas. On the ground floor, you’ll find the Support and Information Zone, Media Centre, Costa Coffee and a variety of IT resources.

Learning Resource Centre Facilities (Bishop Otter Campus)

  • 130 open access PC workstations
  • 45 Apple iMacs
  • Ample printing facilities
  • Netbooks available on loan
  • Professional editing suites
  • Media and equipment loans
  • Wi-Fi and plug points throughout

Where this can take you

We understand the importance of ensuring that you have the knowledge, skills and experience to compete successfully in today’s challenging jobs market. There is ever increasing demand for well-qualified Dance Scientists and the range of specialist and transferrable skills that you will gain from your time at Chichester will appeal to a number of employment settings such as professional, training, educational, recreational and community-based settings. Dance Science graduates could pursue a variety of options including:

Further study at postgraduate level

Chichester offers a range of postgraduate programmes [EQ1] across the field of dance and sport disciplines. Our research interests’ stem from extensive applied experience and a desire to deliver meaningful research findings that relate to the ‘real world’ of dance, dance science or sports and exercise.

Within the profession

  • Dance teacher or lecturer in community or educational settings;
  • Gym instructor;
  • Fitness consultant;
  • Dance science advisor or support personnel in educational or professional settings;
  • Dance science informed dancer / choreographer;
  • Advocate for dance-science informed dance practice;
  • Employee within professional bodies representing dance science and healthy dance practice
  • Health promotion

Work placements

Module options allow for the potential to complete a placement, which could enhance your employability and will build your network within the profession. Students report that work placement offer many benefits, including:

  • Enhanced CV
  • A chance to put theory into practice in the real world context.
  • The opportunity to grow and develop both personally and professionally

Students are ultimately responsible for finding their own placement, however the relevant module tutor and programme leader assists students via their existing network of contacts. The departments of Dance and Sports and Exercise Science have strong links with a variety of organisations and dance companies. These include:

  • Safe in Dance International (SiDI)
  • One Dance UK
  • National Institute of Dance Medicine and Science (NIDMS)
  • International Association of Dance Medicine and Science (IADMS)
  • British Association of Sports and Exercise Science (BASES)
  • Hofesh Schechter
  • Akram Khan
  • Motionhouse
  • DanceUK
  • Loop Dance
  • Stop Gap
  • Jasmin Vardimon
  • Balletboyz
  • South East Dance
  • The Point
  • York Dance Project

In addition, students can undertake work placements in community settings such as sports centres, individual clubs and organisations, mainstream schools, afterschool clubs and special educational needs organisations

Course accreditations

Indicative modules

The first year of study is made up of compulsory core modules. These modules introduce fundamental concepts and skills. Sample content at this level includes:

Year One

Applied psychology for dance

(Module information to come)

Physiology of exercise

(Module information to come)

Anatomy and Biomechanics

(Module information to come)

Movement analysis and awareness

(Module information to come)

Research methodologies

Building on the study skills and knowledge of dance acquired at levels 4 & 5, you will develop a model for your future dissertation research project. Focus will be placed on what methodologies and source materials are most appropriate for this project and how to write a research project. Students will be encouraged to consider and experiment with different methodologies such as various theoretical frameworks (historical, cultural, aesthetic, ethnographic), Practice as Research, and quantitative/qualitative research to cultivate a creative approach to their research and writing. Formal written presentation skills will also be addressed ranging from referencing to the use of appendices, a correctly presented bibliography and general issues relating to how to structure and develop an argument.

Dance techniques (e.g. contemporary, ballet, dance fitness, somatic techniques, contact improvisation);

Daily classes enable you to engage in healthy, safe dance practice, through floor, ballet barre, centre work, travelling exercises and improvisational exercises, designed to develop fundamental technical skills needed for university dance study. Learning and teaching in dance technique allows you to develop movement memory, accuracy in timing, musicality and spatial awareness through repetition of set sequences as well as experiential learning through improvisational techniques.

Key elements of ‘dance fitness’ are introduced in this module: strength (core stability), stamina, coordination, body placement, and kinesthetic awareness. You will be able to transfer knowledge of warm up, cool down and awareness of personal physical abilities and limitations to your own preparation and practice in order to work safely in daily classes.

Following the strong foundation gained in Year One, in second year students are offered a number of elective choices to accompany the core modules, allowing you to begin to shape your preferred area(s) of specialism. At this level students should consider their onward pathway of either Applied Performance or Health and Wellbeing. Research methods, laboratory testing and studio practice remain central to the learning experience. Sample content includes:

Year Two

Performance limitations

Athletic performances span from power and sprint activities lasting less than 10 seconds to endurance activities lasting many hours. The aim of this module is to more fully examine the metabolic, neuromuscular, neuroendocrine and cardiovascular systems of the human body to develop knowledge on the nature of limitations to performance across this intensity spectrum.

Exercise prescription

This module will examine fitness assessments for a range of clients, health screening, principles of exercise prescription and lifestyle management will be discussed. Students will be shown how to demonstrate the use of various gym related equipment including CV, MSE, free weights, and body weight instruction, along with the principles of warm-up and cool-down, flexibility, associated health, safety and welfare; session planning and client support.

Lectures will introduce the principle concepts and some of the underlying areas of debate. A series of practical sessions will be the key mode of module delivery enabling the student to learn through hands-on experience. A tutor will lead all lectures, and where appropriate student interaction will be actively encouraged.

Injury and prevention

(Module information to come)

Psychology of physical activity and health

(Module information to come)

Dance performance options (e.g. repertory, site-based performance, improvisation)

Somatic approaches to dance training (e.g. Feldenkrais, Body-mind Centering)

(Module information to come)

Biomechanics in dance, sports and exercise

(Module information to come)

Clinical exercise physiology

This module reviews literature examining clinical exercise physiology. Health issues such as coronary heart diseases, obesity, diabetes, COPD, arthritis, osteoporosis, cancer and heart failure will be examined with regards to pathophysiology and the responses to physical activity. Fitness assessment will be examined with regards to those who are:- clinically limited, sedentary, moderately fit and recreationally active. Issues associated with health screening and lifestyle management, including exercise guidelines, will be discussed with application to specific disease states.

Nutrition in health and disease

This module will examine the combined effects of nutrition and physical activity on health with particular focus on prevalent diseases associated with these factors. Topics covered will include: dietary guidelines, dietary analysis, measurement of energy, macro- and micro-nutrient intake, digestion, absorption and metabolism; the role of micro-nutrients; nutrition and prevalent diseases; obesity; eating disorders; food allergies; under-nutrition and special populations e.g. diabetics.

Lectures will introduce the central health related concepts and some of the underlying areas of debate. Students will be directed to further reading to support the development of an appropriate knowledge base and seminars and practical classes will be used to review and assess this theoretical development. The key lectures will be supported by regular laboratory and / or seminar sessions during which the students will address the practical analysis of nutrition as well as some of the concepts of application. In addition, students will have the opportunity to discuss the issues raised by the course.

Research methodologies

Building on the study skills and knowledge of dance acquired at levels 4 & 5, you will develop a model for your future dissertation research project. Focus will be placed on what methodologies and source materials are most appropriate for this project and how to write a research project. Students will be encouraged to consider and experiment with different methodologies such as various theoretical frameworks (historical, cultural, aesthetic, ethnographic), Practice as Research, and quantitative/qualitative research to cultivate a creative approach to their research and writing. Formal written presentation skills will also be addressed ranging from referencing to the use of appendices, a correctly presented bibliography and general issues relating to how to structure and develop an argument.

Dance techniques (e.g. contemporary, ballet, dance fitness, somatic techniques, contact improvisation);

Daily classes enable you to engage in healthy, safe dance practice, through floor, ballet barre, centre work, travelling exercises and improvisational exercises, designed to develop fundamental technical skills needed for university dance study. Learning and teaching in dance technique allows you to develop movement memory, accuracy in timing, musicality and spatial awareness through repetition of set sequences as well as experiential learning through improvisational techniques.

Key elements of ‘dance fitness’ are introduced in this module: strength (core stability), stamina, coordination, body placement, and kinesthetic awareness. You will be able to transfer knowledge of warm up, cool down and awareness of personal physical abilities and limitations to your own preparation and practice in order to work safely in daily classes.

In third year, you become increasingly autonomous, undertaking a Research Project. Your module choices should focus your studies on either an Applied Performance or Health and Wellbeing contexts. Some modules provide the opportunity to gain practical experience within the industry or to conduct research with our resident student companies 3Fall (undergraduate) and mapdance (postgraduate), perhaps examining the demands of the specific choreographies, for example.  Sample content, depending on chosen pathway, includes:

Year Three

Body image in performance 

(Module information to come)

Biomechanical techniques

(Module information to come)

Dance Movement Psychotherapy

This module will examine the theory and practice of DMP, exploring a range of theoretical bases which may underpin practice. The module covers psychodynamic, humanistic and transpersonal approaches, and explores integrative creative practice. The module also draws upon the related models of Authentic Movement and movement-based expressive arts therapy (deriving from the Halprin/Tamalpa model). Within all these different approaches, students will be encouraged to explore the core concept of embodying metaphor.

Exercise interventions

(Module information to come)

Psychology of injury and rehabilitation

The module will examine the social and psychological factors thought to underlie susceptibility to injury, drawing from theory and research. It will then examine the theory and research on athlete response to injury, and progress to consider key psychological factors which impact on the athlete’s progress through rehabilitation. The module will take a broad approach to injury focusing on both acute and chronic injury, as well as trauma and disability. It will take an applied perspective in focusing on various techniques and strategies that could be used to promote psychological recovery from injury. Typically, lectures will introduce the theoretical underpinning of an area and examine the associated research evidence. Seminars or workshops will follow where students will engage in small group discussion on specific topics, consider case examples, or develop their research and/or applied skills.

Physiological monitoring in training and performance

The module covers key themes on a week by week basis integrating lectures and practical laboratory classes. The importance of operating within an ethical framework, incorporating issues such as confidentiality and consent, are covered at the start of the module. Over the following weeks students undertake a literature review focussed on identifying: (i) the physiological demands of their selected athletes sport and (ii) existing test procedures, protocols and equipment used in the assessment of athletes from the selected sport. Students are required to identify a ‘pre-season’, ‘competitive season’ and ‘post-season’ within a 12 month timeframe, including dates and locations of competitive performances. On a weekly basis students will critique the rationale underpinning the selection of specific pieces of equipment or protocols that claim to measure the same physiological variable of interest (e.g. Douglas Bag versus breath-by-breath methods of expired gas collection to determine maximal oxygen uptake). The module concludes with consideration given to the value of ‘altitude training’, ‘heat/cold acclimatisation’ and ‘jet lag recovery’ in the preparation of athletes.

Nutritional strategies for performance

This module aims to examine the ways in which dietary intake influences energy metabolism, recovery of skeletal muscle after exercise, exercise performance and training adaptations. Strategies to manipulate the dietary intake of energy, macro- and micro- nutrients through food choices and supplements will be examined in terms of their role of optimisation of training adaptations and sporting performance. An important component of the module will be the practical application of nutritional theory to the sporting arena.

Placement options

The student is expected to undertake a placement of 105 hours (33 hours actual coaching) the remaining 72 hours will include planning, preparation and evaluation. A proposal for the work placement will be produced by the student and agreed by the tutor and host organisation. The curriculum content of the module will be driven by the learning contract, and can contain any aspect of the coaching process and components associated with sports coaching. The student must have a current DBS check, which must be conducted through University of Chichester if the student intends working with children. There is a further form that the student is required to complete if they are intending coaching children under eight years of age in a school environment.

This module is largely student led. A compulsory introductory session is to be attended and subsequently students will be allocated a supervisor, with key tutorials being made available throughout the module.

Teaching dance

This module builds on the experience gained in Teaching Dance Technique to further hone the skills for the effective delivery of dance lesson content to different groups of participants. Where possible the group will observe or work/team teach with groups outside of the University to experience real situations in preparation for their final practical teaching assessment. Micro teaching and group experiential sessions will focus on exploring appropriate lesson content and teaching methods.

Research project

The research project provides students with an opportunity to apply appropriate knowledge, concepts, techniques and research methods to an in-depth investigation into a specific area of sport, exercise or dance research. The research project will employ the knowledge and understanding gained in all the other parts of the programme studied. This module is characterised by a period of independent study and rigorous self-directed research, experimentation and reflection. Students will work independently on a project of their own design, in consultation with support from a tutor, reading, collecting data and performing analyses. This module aims to foster a greater understanding of the processes to undertake a research project. This module marks the culmination of the student’s learning experience. Within a negotiated research framework, over two semesters, students will be expected to submit a wholly written document resulting in a substantial piece of research. The outcomes of the project will be a written project accompanied by a supporting mode of presentation, either a Poster or a Presentation.

Dance techniques (e.g. contemporary, ballet, dance fitness, somatic techniques, contact improvisation);

Daily classes enable you to engage in healthy, safe dance practice, through floor, ballet barre, centre work, travelling exercises and improvisational exercises, designed to develop fundamental technical skills needed for university dance study. Learning and teaching in dance technique allows you to develop movement memory, accuracy in timing, musicality and spatial awareness through repetition of set sequences as well as experiential learning through improvisational techniques.

Key elements of ‘dance fitness’ are introduced in this module: strength (core stability), stamina, coordination, body placement, and kinesthetic awareness. You will be able to transfer knowledge of warm up, cool down and awareness of personal physical abilities and limitations to your own preparation and practice in order to work safely in daily classes.

If you are pursuing the fourth year integrated masters (MSci) you will undertake a significant Research Dissertation which will extend your discipline specific knowledge. Accompanying this module you will complete three other taught modules which will advance your professional and applied techniques within dance science. Sample content, depending on chosen pathway, includes:

Year Four (only for those completing the MSci Dance Science)

Applied techniques in exercise physiology and/or nutrition and/or biomechanics

The module draws on subject knowledge to identify the correct practical skills and procedures required to undertake physiological and nutrition assessment of a client in a human performance laboratory. Students will be introduced to: (A) guidelines for physiological exercise test administration (pre-exercise health screening, consent); baseline assessment (height, mass, urine analysis, body composition, blood profiling, lung function), exercise testing protocols (sub-maximal and maximal); (B) nutritional analysis techniques (dietary prescription, limitations) and (C) data interpretation and feedback.

Performance Psychology

The module will examine a range of psychological characteristics that have been proposed to be important determinants of success in sport. These may include; mental toughness and resilience, challenge and threat metamotivational states, anxiety, self-confidence, achievement goals and attributions. For each characteristic, we will explore the nature of the construct, theoretical impacts and sources of the construct, the research base in the area and the applied implications of the research.

The module will also explore the use of regression analysis in sport and exercise psychology. We will cover the basic assumptions of regression, handling data for regression analyses, conducting and interpreting regression analysis and the limitations of regression analysis.

The majority of the work will be in seminars and workshops although keynote lectures will be given where appropriate. Students will engage in a tutor and peer-supported research project that will also develop their learning of key themes.

Motor learning and control

The module examines the theoretical role of the Central Nervous System and the Peripheral Nervous System in motor control, by critically assessing the Information Processing Theory versus Action Systems Theory debate. Current issues concerning research in motor learning and control will be examined through the study of current research topics such as contextual interference, arousal and performance, knowledge of results, individual differences and performance, implicit learning, and deliberate practice. Other topics will be covered depending on student interests and research developments. The applicability of research to practical situations will be discussed with particular reference to the ecological validity versus experimental control debate.

Strength and conditioning

The module content will include theory and application of physiology, biomechanics, and skill acquisition as they relate to the Strength & Conditioning process. Specifically, it will include focus on, but is not limited to the following: Physiology – the different energy systems, physiological adaptation to training stimulus, factors influencing adaptation, and how physiological demands are measured; Biomechanics – how we describe motion and its practical relevance to the Strength & Conditioning process, how we measure motion, the causes of motion, force, Newton’s laws, power, and their role in prescribing training loads; Skill Acquisition – the process of motor development and learning, the role of cognitive effort in motor skill learning, instructional considerations for the Strength & Conditioning coach, and technique adaptation will be covered in this section.

At the conclusion of this module students should be able to:

Critically appraise the role and processes associated with physiology, biomechanics, and skill acquisition, and their application to the Strength & Conditioning process. Synthesise and critically evaluate a breadth of discipline-specific research. Demonstrate a systematic understanding of the contributions made by physiology, biomechanics, and skill acquisition to inform the Strength & Conditioning process.

Transferable skills specifically developed by this module include:

Demonstrate a critical understanding of the contribution of physiology, biomechanics and skill acquisition to the Strength & Conditioning process The ability to structure one’s own learning The ability to exercise initiative and personal responsibility The ability to work collaboratively and under own initiative The ability to critically review relevant literature The ability to critically evaluate the efficiency and limitations of applied measurement techniques Literacy and numeracy skills IT skills

Pedagogical approaches

Through a combination of lectures, seminars but predominantly practical tasks, students will analyse, deconstruct and reconstruct technical exercises and phrases in order to build a critical base of teaching material. Planning, phrase construction and giving corrections will be explored in the context of somatic development and consideration of issues relating to health and safety. Students will also be expected to undertake critical analysis and evaluation of professional dance classes. Students will be introduced to lesson planning, devising schemes of work appropriate to different teaching situations such as primary and secondary syllabus work, special needs and working with the elderly

Somatically-informed research methodologies

(Module information to come) 

Enhancing physical activity participation and well-being

A consideration of the application of theoretical models to the understanding of exercise and physical activity behaviour. This will include a consideration of research and government reports and guidelines.

Students should have the knowledge and skills to enable them to progress to working within a broad range of settings and contexts relevant to sport and exercise psychology therefore the aim of the module will be to further knowledge of health behaviour change in the context of exercise and physical activity. Students will explore aspects of physical activity behaviour change that enable positive psychological and physical well-being outcomes for individuals. Students will explore key concepts of self-concept, motivation and behaviour change whilst appreciating the range of psychosocial barriers and facilitators that can result in positive or maladaptive affective responses, cognitions and behaviours.

International English Studies

Include International English Studies: 

International English Studies

Teaching and assessment

When you come to Chichester, you join a community of students and lecturers working in partnership to ensure that your learning experience reflects best practice. We pride ourselves on the quality of the teaching given to our students. Innovation, enthusiasm and expertise combine to deliver the excellent standards that give our institution its high reputation for learning and teaching.

HOW THE PROGRAMME WILL BE DELIVERED

Each module is delivered differently, depending on its content and focus of study. Along with sessions designed specifically for the dance science students, some modules include sessions that integrate with the other Dance students or with the Sports and Exercise Science students. In most modules you can expect a combination of theory and practice. A typical week within the semester will include both physical and theoretical learning experiences via dance technique classes (e.g. contemporary and ballet), supplemental training practices, lectures, seminars, tutorials, laboratory skills sessions, studio-based workshops and application of practice.

Many modules will require you to complete some preparatory work, such as reading or an individual/group task. You may also be given structured follow-up tasks after a session, to further progress your learning.  As you progress through your degree, you will be expected to take more and more ownership over your learning and development, directing your study into areas of most interest to you.

HOW YOU WILL BE ASSESSED

Our course includes a mix of assessments, so that you may develop a wide range of transferable skills. You will be assessed by a variety of methods, including essays, examinations, portfolios, practical lab and studio-based assessments, lab reports, and oral presentations.

Modules are assessed at every stage of the course, offering cumulative assessment of your progress. Feedback is offered along the way so that you can monitor your own progress, allowing you the opportunity to discuss and plan your development with your lecturers throughout the course. Where appropriate, special arrangements can be made for students with an identified need.

Additional Costs

Include Additional Costs: 

Additional Costs

Auditions and interviews

  • Applicants will be asked to attend an application event where they will participate in a dance class, an informal interview (normally in pairs), and submit a short written task. This part of the application process is important to evaluate movement and writing competencies, as well as existing understanding about the area of study.

  • You will normally be interviewed in pairs or threes; you will be asked about your experience of, and interest in, dance and dance science to date. We also want to know why you wish to study Dance Science at university.
  • You will take part in a contemporary dance technique class and a creative task-based practical class. We are looking for your potential for dance study (technical and creative practice) and how you work with others on practical tasks.
  • All applicants will be requested to send a short written task prior to interview. This task should be approximately 1 side of A4 and you will be given a topic to choose from. We are looking for your ability to express your views in writing and to get a sense of your understanding of what dance science is, at the time of applying.

For information about timings, what to wear, etc from our 2019-20 auditions, please see the Dance audition booklet.

Dance audition booklet