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BSc (Hons) Psychology

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TOP 20

We were ranked 17th out of 116 universities for the subject of Psychology. The Guardian League Tables 2020

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Codes:

College C58

UCAS C800

Course Length:

3 Years, Full Time

Entry Requirements and Fees

2020/21 UK fee: £9,250

2020/21 International fee: £13,500

For further details about fees, please see our Tuition Fee page.

Typical Offer (individual offers may vary):

  • UCAS Tariff points: 104 – 120 (A levels or combination with AS / EPQ / BTEC/ Cambridge Technical)
  • A levels: BBB - BCC (to include psychology or a science at B)
  • BTEC/Cambridge Technical: DDM - DMM (Applied Science)
  • Access to HE Diploma: Pass (including 12 science credits at Merit)
  • GCSEs: English language, mathematics and a science at grade C or better
  • International Baccalaureate: 28 points (including science Higher at 4)
  • IELTS 6.0 overall with no element lower than 5.5

Not sure you will reach these entry requirements? Take a look at our integrated foundation year.

Student view

Holly throwing graduation cap in the air
Holly
BSc (Hons) Psychology
Studying the BSc (Hons) Psychology helped me realise I love learning; I truly feel that each lecturer’s enthusiasm and wisdom carried my interest further. I knew this would be the place for me, and that gut feeling was right. This University department is very special.
Shivani

Shivani participated on an Erasmus Programme at the University of New Brunswick in Canada.



Study abroad helped me develop personally and academically. I learnt to step out of my comfort zone and embrace challenges: learning to adapt to another university academic system and also culturally adapting with others and making international friends. This is one of the best experiences you can get from university in order to make you grow and prepare for the real world as a graduate.

Course content

The BSc (Hons) Psychology programme has been designed to meet the accreditation criteria of the British Psychological Society (BPS), and has received BPS accreditation of the programme.  

This course will enable you to gain a scientific understanding of the mind, brain, behaviour and experience, as well as the complex interplay between them. Psychological studies have gained increasing importance across a wide range of activities, including human resources, education, sport, social care and the creative industries.

This three year, full-time programme gives students the opportunity to examine the biological, cognitive, developmental, individual difference and social psychological principles underlying everyday experience and behaviour, and then investigating those psychological principles in contexts related to those in which professional psychologists work.

Areas that we explore include at BSc/MSci level include:

  • Is the internet making us miserable?
  • Why is obesity so much higher in Western countries?
  • Can we minimise the effects of dementia?
  • Can men and women be friends?
  • Are people born evil?
  • Is love all we need?
  • How can we eat ourselves healthy?
  • Do we all have criminal intent?
  • What is complete well-being?
  • Can we remember what really happened?
  • Can we define complete wellbeing?

The programme is designed to take students from an analysis of everyday functions and attendant important behaviours, through core discipline knowledge of theory and empirical findings relevant to those behaviours and others, to an appreciation and understanding of contexts in which psychology can be applied.

The key theoretical areas:

  • cognitive psychology and neuropsychology
  • abnormal and forensic psychology
  • developmental psychology
  • individual differences
  • social psychology
  • biological psychology 

The BSc (Hons) Psychology programme sets psychological investigation and knowledge into everyday functions, and encourages students to ask what behaviours are involved in those functions, and how  may those behaviours be explained using psychological constructs and methods of investigation.  A questioning approach to behaviour is thus encouraged from year one. 

At Chichester, psychological investigation and knowledge considers everyday events such as understanding relationships, exploring well being and using technology. Using a questioning approach from the start, we’ll encourage you to ask what behaviours are involved in such events and how those behaviours may be explained using psychological constructs and methods of investigation.

Practical experiments are used as a foundation for understanding and explanation. You’ll learn to link the development of research and analytic skills to explanations relevant to everyday experiences. This approach will continue to the final year where you’ll explore contexts such as work and lifestyle from a psychological perspective. Practical and laboratory experience and skills development is embedded within this process, as is practical experience of research participation, thus linking the development of research and analytic skills to explaining behaviours relevant to everyday functioning and experiences. This approach is carried through to the final year where psychological knowledge is applied to contexts relevant to peoples’ lives and work.

Our facilities

Our specialist facilities and equipment include:

  • Brain Imaging Unit
  • Virtual Reality Unit
  • Psychological Test Centre for psychometric assessments
  • Individual testing cubicles
  • Interview and Observation Suite
  • Eye tracking software
  • Biopac software to measure brain, heart and motor neuron activity
  • Inquisit –  an extensive library of psychological testing paradigms for measuring and manipulating a broad range of psychological constructs
  • aLIAS - an affective immersive emotional Virtual Reality stimuli package which allows researchers to create ‘different worlds’
  • NIRScout - a cutting edge 3D scalable neuroimaging platform with a dedicated ultra-high-density near-infrared spectroscopy system which measures changes in the cerebral cortex

Where this can take you

Molly in graduation gown

Alumna View

"I feel privileged to have studied at the University of Chichester. My experience was positive from beginning to end, with continual support from everyone I encountered. My degree became a gateway to opportunities that I wouldn’t have otherwise had, giving me a foundation of knowledge that equipped me to volunteer within mental health, leading to employment, and postgraduate study. Without my qualifications and experience at Chichester I wouldn’t be where I am today”.

Molly

 

A first degree in psychology, with status of the Graduate Basis for Registration (GBR) with the BPS provides a foundation for you to progress to specialist areas of psychology, and subsequent status as a Chartered Psychologist. There are currently 10 professional Divisions within the BPS, including Clinical Psychology, Educational Psychology, Sport and Exercise Psychology.

All of these have professional training programmes, for which the attainment of GBR is essential.  As well as providing a sound basis for work as a professional psychologist, a psychology degree provides a good insight into human behaviour that equips graduates with the skills that enable them to work in a wide range of fields, including:

  • Industry
  • Media
  • Teaching
  • Work with children, adults and families
  • IT
  • Computing
  • Marketing
  • Civil Service

Course accreditations

Indicative modules

There are opportunities to select optional modules such as evolutionary psychology and to specialise in the practical application of theory to a range of disciplines, including sport and exercise, health, business, marketing, early years, education, and the creative arts. The first year of the programme also introduces research methods, both quantitative and qualitative, which are developed over the next two years to give students the confidence to undertake their own projects. In the final year, students have the opportunity to carry out their own research project.

Year one module information:

Everyday Experience and Psychological Methods: Understanding Relationships

Functions of understanding relationships will be broken down into contributory functions to lead to an exploration of selected experiences of relationships through some processes related to forming an impression of someone, feeling attracted or not to them, wanting to be their friend or partner, getting to know them and forming a relationship with them through a variety of behaviours such as seeing them, talking to them and meeting them socially. Certain psychological theories and empirical findings from investigations into impression formation, attraction, prejudice, and stereotyping and relationship formation will be introduced and a range of methodologies and analyses, such as interviewing, content analysis and observational approaches will be explored.

Everyday Experience and Psychological Methods: Analysing Attitudes to Work

The module provides the opportunity to understand a broad area of everyday experience in terms of psychological models of attitudes. The module aims to show how to analyse attitudes allowing psychological constructs, methodology and theories that are associated with that experience to be elucidated and explored. The module will, importantly, provide students with their first steps in developing fundamental data analysis skills, via (partly interactive) lectures and the opportunity to practice using statistical software. The focus will be on understanding patterns of data via visualization; the use of numerical statistical descriptions of samples, where necessary bringing students’ numeracy up to the level they need for the course; and the basic concept and relevance of statistical significance testing of hypotheses in psychology.

Everyday Experience & Psychological Methods: Exploring Positive Psychology

The module will explore the experience of living the dream relating the need to understand one’s own motivation, aspirations, and goals to self development, personality, need for achievement, self efficacy, and self esteem. Psychological theories and empirical findings from investigations into needs, motivation, and self concept will be introduced, and questionnaire-based methodology will be explored.

Everyday Experience & Psychological Methods: Usability and Cognition

The module will explore the experience of using everyday technologies such as cash machines, mobile phones, i-pods, and computers, relating the need to learn and remember how to operate them to processes of memory, attention, and decision-making on the one hand, and their usability on the other. Psychological theories and empirical findings from investigations into learning, perception, memory, attention and human-machine interaction will be introduced, and experimental methodology will be explored.

Perspectives on Psychology

The module seeks to enable the student to understand the contribution of key thinkers to the development of modern psychology, and to appreciate their biographical backgrounds. The lives and work of key thinkers will be introduced, and contextualised with reference to contemporary ideas and mores.

Principles of Psychology

(Module information to come)

Interpersonal Skills

(Module information to come)

Study & Research Skills for Psychologists

The module will begin with a consideration of scientific reasoning and reflection skills. Other areas that will be included are effective use of information sources, effective reading skills, note-taking, essay writing skills, listening and interviewing skills, and skills involved in writing research reports and presenting scientific information.

Year two module information:

Biological Psychology

The module will provide an introduction to the ways biological processes have been studied, for example through brain lesions and cell stimulation methodologies. The areas of behavioural genetics, neuro-imaging, neuropsychology, socio-biology and evolutionary psychology will be investigated in terms of underlying theory and empirical research.

Cognitive Psychology

The module will provide an introduction to the ways cognitive processes have been studied, for example through experimental and cognitive neuropsychological methodologies. The areas of attention, perception, learning, thinking and language will be investigated in terms of underlying theory and empirical research.

Developmental Psychology

Developmental Psychology involves the study of development and maturation in cognitive, personality and social processes. The aim of the module is to introduce students to basic theory, research findings and methods of investigation in childhood, adolescence and lifespan development. The module will aim to provide a critical understanding of the ways in which behaviour is influenced by developmental factors, the nature of developmental processed, and the ways which empirical research can help us to understand how developmental processes influence what we do.

Individual Differences Psychology

The module will provide an introduction to the ways individual differences processes have been studied, for example through psychometrics and case study methodologies. The areas of personality, intelligence, cognitive style, motivation, gender and ethnicity will be investigated in terms of underlying theory and empirical research.

Abnormal and Forensic Psychology

For abnormal psychology, we will cover various psychological disorders, as well as theoretical, clinical, and experimental perspectives of the study of psychopathology, with an emphasis on terminology, classification, aetiology, assessment, and treatment of the major disorders. For forensic psychology, topics include eyewitness testimony and identification, lie detection, psychological assessments, offender treatment, and correctional psychology.

Social Psychology

(Module information to come)

Research Methods for Psychology: Experimental Designs & Analysis

The module will develop knowledge of experimental approaches to investigating and analysing psychological data. The relationship between experiment and causal reasoning will be outlined. Areas covered include ANOVA designs and analysis.

Research Methods for Psychology: Survey and Qualitative Designs And Analysis

The module will develop knowledge of survey and qualitative approaches to investigating and analysing psychological data, including multiple regression. The relationship between correlational analysis and predictive reasoning will be outlined. Areas covered will include multivariate analysis (multiple and logistic regression) and content analysis.

Year three module information:

Independent Project

Students are encouraged to adopt a problem-oriented approach of which the first stage is to identify a problem in psychology which is of interest and relevance to their first degree studies. An appropriate approach to addressing the problem is then determined through discussion with tutors who have relevant theoretical and practical expertise. The investigation may be based within a single discipline, or it may involve more than one discipline, but it must be based within the students chosen degree programme. In all cases tutors will advise on the capability of the student to complete the complexity of the study in the time available and with the necessary resources.

Psychology Project Management and Presentation Skills

The course will cover the project management skills involved in independent psychological research and its presentation. Ares covered will include time-management, assertiveness, negotiation, scientific reporting, and use of visual presentation software.

Psychology in Context: Work and Organisations

The course will consider a range of relationships between working conditions, jobs and organisational processes, psychological outcomes and their impact on job and organisational performance. Psychological reactions including job satisfaction, job stress, motivation, work engagement, and organisational commitment are investigated, and organizational functions such as job design, health & safety at work, and organisational team-working, are considered.

Psychology in Context: Cultural Psychology

The module will take an interdisciplinary approach to the major topics of Psychology, including Biological, Cognition, Development, Health, Individual Differences, Social, and the Self, and will relate them to life in a multicultural world. Topics will include an introduction to cultural psychology, culture and human nature, cultural evolution, methods for studying culture and psychology, development and socialization, and cultural differences in: the self and personality, motivation, cognition and perception, interpersonal attraction, close relationships, group processes, living in multicultural worlds, physical health, mental health, morality, justice, and emotions.

Psychology in Context: Psychology & Social Issues

The module will provide an introduction to psychological and interdisciplinary focus on ten issues of current social concern. The areas of discrimination (gender, age, race, disability and sexual orientation ), perceptions of rape and rape victims, child abuse and family violence, the psychology of material possessions, shopping and shopping addiction, childhood (non-verbal communication and interventions), health and health inequalities , sexual health, contraception and abortion, chronic illness, dying, death and bereavement, health promotion, disease prevention and the health care system will be investigated in terms of underlying theory and empirical research.

Psychology in Context: Professional Skills in Psychology

The course will consider some of the key methods and assessment techniques that are commonly used by professional Psychologists in their daily working lives. The module will introduce some of the key principles of effective counselling psychology and the importance of empathy and positive regard to the success of the therapeutic relationship. Effective interviewing skills for Psychologists will be identified and outlined with respect to structured and semi-structured clinical interviews. Students will participate in an interviewing session that will be recorded on video. The module will build on from theory outlined in the Individual Differences module and examine key psychometric principles underlying psychological tests of intelligence and personality. Students will participate in the supervised administration of a major standardised test of intelligence, to gain experience in psychometric test administration, scoring, and interpretation.

Exercise and Physical Activity Interventions

The course will evaluate the evidence supporting current practices of professionals involved in physical activity adoption and maintenance. The areas of individual, group-based and community interventions will be examined in terms of their theoretical underpinning, structure and evaluative methods. A particular emphasis will be placed upon interventions with specialised populations including individuals with mental health problems.

The course will progress through lectures, seminars and practical workshops. In most cases, a lecture will precede a follow-up workshop or seminar. The workshops will be designed to enable the students to gain experience of a more specific aspect of the area covered. Students will be required to read the designated material before the seminars and workshops, so that they may be able to observe and critically comment upon work in the area. Where appropriate, suitable external speakers will be invited to offer students and insight into the application of exercise intervention and health promotion. The written assignment will be submitted and marked during the module delivery to provide students with feedback on their progress.

Applied Sports Psychology 2: Professional Practice

The module will explore the nature and scope of practice, and the varied role of the applied practitioner as a mental skills trainer, counsellor, clinician, and in an organisational capacity will be examined. Approaches to and models of practice will be explored, alongside research evidence for their relative efficacy. Practical case examples will be used throughout the module as exemplars of applied practice in action, and to discuss critical professional and ethical issues that the practitioner might encounter.

International English Studies

Include International English Studies: 

Teaching and assessment

You’ll build your subject knowledge and practical experience through core and optional teaching modules appropriate to the breadth of the curriculum.

Your learning encompasses development of core knowledge and skills intrinsic to professional practice and psychological research.

Learning is supported by lectures, workshops and tutorials to encourage theoretical and critical inquiry, debate and practical research skills.

Assessment takes formative forms such as in class debates, presentations, quizzes and problem solving applying analytical techniques.

Summative assessment involves a wide range of activity such as scientific reports, essays, group and individual presentations, poster design, multiple choice papers, short answer papers and essay exams.

Throughout your degree, modules are delivered in a variety of ways including:

  1. Standard module: A single module scheduled over one semester (15 credits normally) examples: Everyday Experience and Psychology, Perspectives in Psychology, Biological Psychology
  2. Triple module: A triple module is spread over two semesters (45 credits normally) to enable you to develop and conduct original psychological research towards your dissertation under supervision examples: Independent Project
  3. All modules: Allow you to begin to develop and to expand core subject knowledge and research skills necessary for degree study. Teaching is delivered through lectures and practical sessions, linking psychological theory to research and professional practice. 

Additional Costs

Include Additional Costs: 

Additional Costs

Student Opportunities

As a student in the Department there are a variety of opportunities which may be available to you.  These include:

  • Study Abroad
  • Erasmus
  • Internships
  • Placements
  • Voluntary Research Assistant

Psychology supports students in both the BSc and MSci programme pathways who wish to broaden their academic and cultural experience by choosing to study abroad for one semester as part of their degree studies. This is an exciting chance for students who wish to widen their horizons and immerse themselves in a different culture and encounter how the discipline of Psychology is viewed and taught at universities in Europe or North America.

We are currently expanding the range of international exchange opportunities that we offer our students. For example, under Erasmus agreements students might like to study for a semester at either Maastricht or Radboud universities in the Netherlands, where Psychology classes are delivered through the English language.

The Erasmus programme provides mobility grants, which cover additional expenses of studying abroad and students are exempt from tuition fees at the host university. It is increasingly popular for our students to look to studying abroad in North America where we have a wide range of partnership colleges and universities in both Canada (University of New Brusnswick) and the United States (e.g., Queens College – New Work;  Columbus State University; St. Norbert’s College; Mercer University – Georgia; University of Northern Iowa). The tuition fees for the semester abroad will be those of the University of Chichester (i.e., the same as any other semester of study at Chichester) and not of the host North American institution. Students who wish to take up the opportunity to study abroad liaise with the Department’s International Exchange Officer, Dr. Ian Tyndall, to ensure that the modules selected for study at their chosen university meet the requirements for a British Psychology Society accredited degree. Students are further supported in the application process by the University of Chichester’s International Office staff.