Book a campus tour

BSc (Hons) Sport and Exercise Science

 

Read More

Institution C58

UCAS C604

3 years Full Time

Entry Requirements and Fees

2020/21 UK fee: £9,250

2020/21 International fee: £13,500

For further details about fees, please see our Tuition Fee page.

 

Typical Offer (individual offers may vary):

Tariff points: 112 - 120

A Levels: BBC - BCC (including a science - PE accepted at grade C or above)

BTEC: DDM - DMM (including Sports Science)

GCSEs: English language, mathematics and science at grade C/4 or better

International Baccalaureate: 28 points

IELTS 6.0 overall with no element lower than 5.5

Access to HE Diploma to Science: Pass with at least 12 credits worth of science units at Merit

Student view

Manisha

"The course has allowed me to broaden my understanding on the subject as well as apply my learned knowledge throughout. Lectures and seminars are very engaging and interesting. The teaching support is outstanding and all lecturers are willing to provide the best help they can."

Andy

"Returning to education as a mature student was a little daunting, but my experience of studying at Chichester has been brilliant. Life around campus is fun and friendly and my course has given me the chance to learn new skills, get involved in research and discover lots of different sports science disciplines. Lecturers are always available to help and answer questions and their open door policy provides a relaxed and welcoming atmosphere."

Course content

Our British Association of Sport and Exercise Sciences (BASES) endorsed Sport and Exercise Science programme is built on strong foundations as we were one of the first institutions in the UK to develop a sports related degree programme. You can choose to specialise in Sport Performance or Physical Activity for Health. 

The aims of the programme are to develop sports science graduates who have the scientific theory and practical skills required to work as sport scientists, supporting individuals or teams towards peak performance or to work as health and exercise professionals within exercise referral schemes or other community programmes for promoting an active lifestyle. 

In year one students will experience a breadth of disciplines underpinning sport and exercise science before tailoring and personalising their degree to either a Sport Performance (SP) or Physical Activity for Health (PAH) route.

BSc (Hons) Sport and Exercise Science (Sport Performance)

Our Sport Performance themed pathway provides you with the skills and knowledge required to assess critically the physiological, biomechanical and psychological characteristics of the athlete and to apply these skills to performance enhancement. We have a strong tradition of applied sports science delivery and this transfers to our hands-on laboratory-based course. Career opportunities within these sectors are rapidly on the increase as we move towards the next Olympic Games.

BSc (Hons) Sport and Exercise Science (Physical Activity for Health)

This route gives you the opportunity to work with diverse populations in the physical activity, exercise and health sectors. Career opportunities within these sectors are rapidly on the increase as a result of the Government’s drive to help people live longer with healthier living by reducing unhealthy lifestyle factors such as physical inactivity, poor diet and obesity.

Our facilities

Campus Location: Chichester 

We offer you some of the best sporting facilities available to study for a degree. All of our facilities are designed for academic teaching, research, British Universities and Colleges Sport (BUCS) competitions and for your social/recreational use throughout the week and weekends.

The world-class Tudor Hale Centre for Sport is the focus of sporting activities both academic and recreational at the University. It incorporates a suite of state of the art sport science laboratories, a sports injury clinic, a strength and conditioning room and a fitness centre. In addition there is a sports hall. Located beside the Tudor Hale Centre for Sport you will find our Sports Dome, lano sand dressed astro turf and a grass rugby pitch.

Facilities:

Sports Dome

Four tennis courts which can be used for a variety of sports.

Blue flooring and blue curtains separating courts with student throwing javelins
 

Sports hall

Used for basketball, netball, trampolining, badminton, volleyball, cricket, soccer, table tennis, hockey and ultimate frisbee.

Fitness suite

Various membership levels available. Weights, resistance and cardio machines.

Weights, resistance and cardio machines

Indoor and outdoor climbing walls and climbing boulder

Available for any student to use after an induction and when Tudor Hale Centre for Sport is open.

Images showing external and internal climbing wall and external boulder

Grass football and rugby pitches

Students playing football and girl passing rugby ball

Floodlit lano sand-dressed astro turf 

A top of the range Lano sand-dressed astro all completely compliant to International Hockey federation standards.

  • 110m synthetic athletics track
  • Strength and conditioning room
  • Two multi-purpose gymnasiums
  • Outdoor netball and tennis court
  • Two seminar rooms
  • Cricket nets 

Sport Science Laboratories:

Four dedicated psychology labs including a Virtual Reality Reader, Brain Imaging Unit and Observation Suite.

Student using software to track activity of body for sport psychology

Two dedicated biomechanics labs

Student running with rugby ball with sensor on past tracking posts

Five dedicated physiology labs

Used for testing on treadmills, bikes and various other pieces of equipment.

Physiology labs showing equipment used

An environmental chamber

Used to simulate heat, altitude, etc.

Envinronmental chamber in physiology lab

A sports injury clinic and adjoining rehabilitation space

Sports Therapy students use these spaces for practical sessions and run a clinic. It is open for students, staff and external visitors who require treatment also either from Sports Therapy students or staff.

Sports therapy clinic with beds and rehab room

Where this can take you

“The Sports and Exercise Science degree not only provided me with a good underpinning knowledge of human anatomy and physiology in relation to both health and disease, it also enabled me to gain valuable experience and confidence with handling scientific data; and further promoted my interpersonal skills such as being organised, proactive and my managing time effectively.”

Mark, BSc Sport and Exercise Science (Physical Activity for Health) graduate and now a Senior Cardiac Physiologist

 

“My degree has helped me massively to share the knowledge I have gained throughout my degree in a simpler form to the younger generations inspiring them to participate and love sports and physical activity and the benefits they reap from it. I’m thankful for my undergraduate degree as it has set me up tremendously to be able to share the complex knowledge I learnt in a simpler form for young people.”

Megan, BSc Sport and Exercise Science (Physical Activity for Health) graduate and now training to be a PE teacher at the University of Chichester

 

Dev in graduation gown and cap

"My work placement on the degree was invaluable and helped me with my job. I'm responsible the for the Analysis for GB Wheelchair Tennis, be that during training or matches, singles or doubles. The course gave me exposure to the foundations and implementation of Performance Analysis. I liked that it combined statistics and sport. You get to help with athlete/coach development and watch sport every day. "

Dev, BSc (Hons) Sport and Exercise Science (Sports Performance), graduate and now Performance Analyst for Lawn Tennis Association

 

Amy headshot

"My degree gave me an insight into the multi-disciplinary approach needed to support high performance sport and gave me a good breadth of understanding across a range of fields that directly influence sports performance. The degree has supported my role with the necessary skills required to effectively manage multiple high-profile projects at once, stay up to date with current share practices and research and develop strong working relationships across a broad range of individuals from different knowledge and experience background to achieve a common end goal. It is so rewarding using what my degree taught me, either directly or indirectly, help me positively impact so many people on their journey either in high performance sport or within their recovery journey from being in military service. My main duties are to support WIS athletes on a Paralympic performance trajectory as part of the Sports Recovery Athlete Academy and manage the sport components for Team UK in the build up to, during and after any major event such as the Invictus Games and Warrior Games."

Amy, BSc (Hons) Sport and Exercise Science (Sports Performance), graduate and Help For Heroes Performance Pathway Scientist and Major Events Sports Manager

 

Career Options

  • Athletic trainer
  • Senior Cardiac Physiologist
  • Sports psychologist
  • Sports science support personnel
  • Teacher

Have you thought about postgraduate study? We offer a range of taught postgraduate MSc programmes, in addition to postgraduate research programmes (MPhil/PhD) across the field of sport disciplines. Supervision is offered by a strong, research-active team with a range of expertise. Our research interests stem from applied experience to deliver ‘real world’ meaningful results. Alumni receive a 15% discount on postgraduate courses at Chichester.

*Subject to approval

Work placements

Through our work placements you will develop skills which allow you to apply theory and knowledge in an operational sport or health setting.

Placements opportunities are available on most programmes within the Chichester Institute of Sport which provide you with a strong vocational focus.

"My placement involved a combination of dietitian/nurse shadowing; using current literature to develop resources for patients; and presenting talks on physical activity and its benefits to patients in their Tier 3 weight management programme. The placement was a real eye opener and provided me with the opportunity to apply what I have learnt in my other modules in a clinical setting”

Dan, Physical Activity Consultant, Bariatric Unit, St Richards Hospital

 

“I am spending my placement as an occupational physiologist within the Occupational Performance Research Group (OPRG). This has given me the chance to observe what is expected within a professional sports science environment, working with various occupations and focusing on a large contribution to military-based research.”

Oliver,  Exercise Physiologist, Occupational Performance Research Group

 

Chichester Institute of Sport has a dedicated placement coordinator.

Students are ultimately responsible for finding their own placement, however the placement coordinator is available to assist students and has a network of contacts in local clubs and schools.

Our students are from all over the UK, with the majority from the South and South East of England, with a few students from overseas. Many students find work placements in their home towns, as well as local opportunities in Sussex.

Placements are integral to your development as a student and are integrated within University-based work.

You will need to ensure you have all the necessary documentation in place before you start your placement. Some courses will insist that you complete a DBS check on entry to the course and others will require you to complete a check once you have started. Please check that you have completed all necessary documentation before commencing your placement.

To contact the Placement Coordinator please email Clare Deacon at c.deacon@chi.ac.uk or call 01243 793542.

Course accreditations

Indicative modules

In Year One you will experience a breadth of disciplines underpinning sport and exercise science before tailoring and personalising your degree to either a Sport Performance (SP) or Physical Activity for Health (PAH) route.

These modules include:

Year One: Sport Performance and Physical Activity for Health

Questioning Sport and Exercise

(Module information to come)

Evaluating Sport and Exercise

(Module information to come)

Introduction to Sport and Exercise Psychology

(Module information to come)

Introduction to Skill Acquisition

(Module information to come)

Fundamentals of Human Physiology

(Module information to come)

Introduction to Applied Sport and Exercise Physiology

(Module information to come)

Muscles and Movement 1 and 2

This module aims to introduce students to the basic concepts of anatomy and biomechanics as they relate to human movement and performance in sport and exercise. Students are shown how such concepts can be practically investigated and will illustrate the integrative nature of anatomy and biomechanics. Practical work considers the general principles of biomechanics related methodology, data analysis and statistical analysis for practical investigations into the evaluation of sport and exercise.

Year Two: Sport Performance

Following the strong foundation gained in Year One you can now maximise your choices and specialise through the degree route of Sport Performance. In Year Two you are offered bespoke modules and electives to enhance their theoretical and practical skills to obtain a career in sports performance.

Researching Sport and Exercise

This module will build upon the knowledge and skills obtained in Scientific Enquiry into Sport and Exercise (SPL130) and students will further develop skills in research methods and statistical analysis, with a broad focus on parametric procedures of analysis of variance and linear regression. These two methods are commonly used procedures in the sports sciences, and understanding of these will also provide a solid foundation for understanding more advanced statistical procedures that students may learn in their future work (e.g. IP or postgraduate study). The module will provide students with practical skills of conducting research in the sport and exercise environment and students will further their research skills, incl. ethical considerations, research design and methodology, analysis and write-up.

Sports Injury and Prevention

(Module information to come)

Sport and Exercise in Extreme Environments

This module will examine the physiological responses to extreme environments. The consequences of acute exposure to environmental stressors will be identified as well as the mechanisms by which acclimatisation to chronic exposure takes place. Topics covered will include: exercise in hypobaric and hyperbaric environments, altitude training, space physiology, exercise and air pollution, thermoregulation, maintenance of fluid balance, and exercise in the heat and cold.

A weekly lecture will introduce the principle physiological concepts and some of the underlying areas of debate. Students will be directed to further reading to support the development of an appropriate knowledge base. A weekly laboratory session and/or group seminar will support the lectures. During the laboratory sessions, students will address the practical application of physiological theory within the context of athletic performance. Students will be required to develop their laboratory skills in the collection of data in a small-scale research project. This project will take place in the Sport Science laboratories. An opportunity to discuss issues raised by this module will also be available in these sessions.

Cognitive Psychology for Sport Performance

(Module information to come)

Motivating Athletes

Even with all the natural talent in the world sports performers need to be highly motivated to achieve success. In recent years it has become accepted that although motivation is determined in part by personality traits, the environment plays a major role in shaping motivation. Thus coaches are in a unique position to influence the motivation (and hence performance, achievement and health) of the people they coach. The aims of this module are thus to evaluate current perspectives and research on motivation in sport and to examine strategies for enhancing motivation within the coaching process.

Biomechanics in Sport and Exercise

(Module information to come)

Physiological Limitations to Performance

Athletic performances span from power and sprint activities lasting less than 10 seconds to endurance activities lasting many hours. The aim of this module is to more fully examine the metabolic, neuromuscular, neuroendocrine and cardiovascular systems of the human body to develop knowledge on the nature of limitations to performance across this intensity spectrum.

Year Three: Sport Performance

The final year gives you the opportunity to specialise further and complete the following modules:

Research Project

Students are encouraged to adopt a problem-oriented approach of which the first stage is to identify a problem in sport, exercise or sports therapy which is of interest and relevance to their degree studies. An appropriate approach to addressing the problem is then determined through discussion with tutors who have relevant theoretical and practical expertise. The investigation may be based within a single discipline, or it may involve more than one discipline, but it must be based within the student’s chosen degree program. In all cases, tutors will advise on the capability of the student to complete the complexity of the study in the time available and with the necessary resources. Students are introduced to the preparation of a research project during the Researching Sport & Exercise module at level 5. Students can work independently on a project of their own design or in a group on a pre-determined project, in consultation with and with support from a tutor, reading, collecting data and performing analyses. Students will submit an ethics form for a pass/fail grade as part of the approval process for the project. The project cannot begin until the ethical approval process is complete. Students are allowed to request feedback on one draft of each section of the research report with the exception of the discussion.

Biomechanical Techniques

(Module information to come)

Physiological Monitoring of Training and Performance

The module covers key themes on a week by week basis integrating lectures and practical laboratory classes. The importance of operating within an ethical framework, incorporating issues such as confidentiality and consent, are covered at the start of the module. Over the following weeks students undertake a literature review focussed on identifying: (i) the physiological demands of their selected athletes sport and (ii) existing test procedures, protocols and equipment used in the assessment of athletes from the selected sport. Students are required to identify a ‘pre-season’, ‘competitive season’ and ‘post-season’ within a 12 month timeframe, including dates and locations of competitive performances. On a weekly basis students will critique the rationale underpinning the selection of specific pieces of equipment or protocols that claim to measure the same physiological variable of interest (e.g. Douglas Bag versus breath-by-breath methods of expired gas collection to determine maximal oxygen uptake). The module concludes with consideration given to the value of ‘altitude training’, ‘heat/cold acclimatisation’ and ‘jet lag recovery’ in the preparation of athletes.

Group Dynamics

(Module information to come)

Advanced Biomechanics

(Module information to come)

Year Two: Physical Activity for Health

Following the strong foundation gained in Year One, students can now maximise their choices and specialise through the degree route of Physical Activity for Health. In Year Two, students are offered bespoke modules and electives to enhance their theoretical and practical skills to obtain a career in the physical activity and health sector.

Researching Sport and Exercise

This module will build upon the knowledge and skills obtained in Scientific Enquiry into Sport and Exercise (SPL130) and students will further develop skills in research methods and statistical analysis, with a broad focus on parametric procedures of analysis of variance and linear regression. These two methods are commonly used procedures in the sports sciences, and understanding of these will also provide a solid foundation for understanding more advanced statistical procedures that students may learn in their future work (e.g. IP or postgraduate study). The module will provide students with practical skills of conducting research in the sport and exercise environment and students will further their research skills, incl. ethical considerations, research design and methodology, analysis and write-up.

Project Management

Project management has become increasingly an essential technique for managers in a variety of industries. What was once a technique only applied to large construction and engineering projects has become ubiquitous across all sectors of the economy to such an extent that many talk of the ‘projectification’ of society. In this module, the discipline of project management will be critically surveyed and students will apply project management techniques and concepts to plan a project in the area of public health.

Developing and Monitoring Fitness for Performance and Health

In most cases, successful sporting performance is dependent on the physical development of participants to meet the demands of their activity. The aim of the module is to provide students with a grounding in the knowledge of planning physical fitness tests and fitness training programmes. Furthermore, the module aims to develop practitioners with the mentality to look for, and skills to find and evaluate, scientific evidence to support their practice.

Psychology of Physical Activity and Health

(Module information to come)

Clinical Exercise Physiology

(Module information to come)

Clinical Biomechanics

(Module information to come)

Nutrition for the Prevention and Treatment of Disease

This module will examine the combined effects of nutrition and physical activity on health with particular focus on prevalent diseases associated with these factors. Topics covered will include: dietary guidelines, dietary analysis, measurement of energy, macro- and micro-nutrient intake, digestion, absorption and metabolism; the role of micro-nutrients; nutrition and prevalent diseases; obesity; eating disorders; food allergies; under-nutrition and special populations e.g. diabetics.

Lectures will introduce the central health related concepts and some of the underlying areas of debate. Students will be directed to further reading to support the development of an appropriate knowledge base and seminars and practical classes will be used to review and assess this theoretical development. The key lectures will be supported by regular laboratory and / or seminar sessions during which the students will address the practical analysis of nutrition as well as some of the concepts of application. In addition, students will have the opportunity to discuss the issues raised by the course.

Year Three: Physical Activity for Health

The final year gives students the opportunity to specialise further and complete the following modules:

Research Project

Students are encouraged to adopt a problem-oriented approach of which the first stage is to identify a problem in sport, exercise or sports therapy which is of interest and relevance to their degree studies. An appropriate approach to addressing the problem is then determined through discussion with tutors who have relevant theoretical and practical expertise. The investigation may be based within a single discipline, or it may involve more than one discipline, but it must be based within the student’s chosen degree program. In all cases, tutors will advise on the capability of the student to complete the complexity of the study in the time available and with the necessary resources. Students are introduced to the preparation of a research project during the Researching Sport & Exercise module at level 5. Students can work independently on a project of their own design or in a group on a pre-determined project, in consultation with and with support from a tutor, reading, collecting data and performing analyses. Students will submit an ethics form for a pass/fail grade as part of the approval process for the project. The project cannot begin until the ethical approval process is complete. Students are allowed to request feedback on one draft of each section of the research report with the exception of the discussion.

Physical Activity, Obesity and Diabetes

(Module information to come)

Exercise and Physical Activity Interventions

The course will evaluate the evidence supporting current practices of professionals involved in physical activity adoption and maintenance. The areas of individual, group-based and community interventions will be examined in terms of their theoretical underpinning, structure and evaluative methods. A particular emphasis will be placed upon interventions with specialised populations including individuals with mental health problems.

The course will progress through lectures, seminars and practical workshops. In most cases, a lecture will precede a follow-up workshop or seminar. The workshops will be designed to enable the students to gain experience of a more specific aspect of the area covered. Students will be required to read the designated material before the seminars and workshops, so that they may be able to observe and critically comment upon work in the area. Where appropriate, suitable external speakers will be invited to offer students and insight into the application of exercise intervention and health promotion. The written assignment will be submitted and marked during the module delivery to provide students with feedback on their progress.

Cardiovascular Rehabilitation

The module seeks to explore cardiovascular rehabilitation by using a case study and problem solving approach. Patient assessment, both physiological and psychological, will be introduced. Consideration of risk factors, lifestyle modification, exercise testing and interventions will be brought together to present a holistic approach to the process of rehabilitation. Students will focus on the practical aspects of a rehabilitation practitioner and be expected to engage with patients and health professionals in the development of an individual rehabilitation programme.

Lectures will introduce the principal concepts and theories involved in obesity and diabetes. The lectures will be supported by group seminars and laboratory / field based work. Laboratory work and practical exercise sessions will further develop clinical physiology skills and measurement techniques. Application to patient populations will provide opportunity for experimental learning within a clinical setting.

Exercise Referral Clinic

(Module information to come)

Additional Vocational Qualifications:

  • Level 2 Gym Instructor
  • Level 3 Personal Training
  • Level 3 Exercise Referral
  • Level 4 Cardiovascular Disease

The above four qualifications are PDA Approved and accredited by REPs.

International English Studies

Include International English Studies: 

Teaching and assessment

We pride ourselves on the quality of the teaching given to our students. Innovation, enthusiasm and expertise combine to deliver the excellent standards that give our institution its high reputation for learning and teaching.

When you come to Chichester, you will join a community of students and lecturers working in partnership to ensure that your learning experience reflects best practice and embraces the opportunities presented by new, interactive technologies.

How the programme will be delivered

Each module is delivered differently, depending on its content and focus of study.  In most modules you can expect lead lectures to introduce core content, but the majority of your time will be spent working in small groups with tutor support in seminars, workshops or laboratory sessions.

Many sessions will require you to have completed some preparatory work, and you will also be given structured follow-up work after a session to further progress your learning, often reading or an individual/group task.  As you progress through your degree, you will be expected to take more and more ownership over your learning and development, directing your study into areas of most interest to you.

How you will be assessed

You will be assessed by a variety of methods, including essays, examinations, portfolios, practical assessments, lab reports, and oral presentations.

Our course includes a mix of assessments, so that you may develop a wide range of transferable skills. Modules are assessed at every stage of the course, offering cumulative assessment of your progress. You can monitor your own progress, allowing you the opportunity to discuss and plan your development with your lecturers throughout the course. Where appropriate, special arrangements can be made for students with an identified need.

Additional Costs

Include Additional Costs: 

Why this course?

  • Strong emphasis on theory to practice 
  • A highly practical course delivered in cutting edge sport and exercise science laboratories
  • Taught by an expert staff team who genuinely care about your development
  • Internationally renowned research and cutting edge applied practice
  • Autonomy and choice in learning throughout the programme
  • Integrated vocational qualifications to make you highly employable

Additional costs

As a University of Chichester student you will be provided with many things to support you and there may be additional costs which you may encounter whilst studying. The information below will help you understand our provision and what else you need to budget for.

  • We charge for the assessments for the Additional Vocational Qualifications
  • If you undertake a placement which requires a DBS check, this will cost £44
  • Field Trips / Educational Visits – these are optional and do not have to be undertaken to complete the programme. Students make a contribution towards the cost (e.g. travel, sometimes accommodation)
  • If you require a Diagnostic Assessment for a Specific Learning Difficulty such as Dyslexia, the University may be able to assist you arrange this. You will be required to pay for this assessment, although some financial assistance may be possible from the University Hardship Fund. Further information is available from the Disability and Dyslexia Service. For more information, please visit their page
  • Graduation: It is free for the student to attend the ceremony itself. Graduands must wear academic dress. Academic dress, guest tickets and photography are additional costs payable by the student

Financial help available from the University

We offer a number of scholarships and bursaries to students who are beginning their studies at Chichester. Our Finance pages provides details on living costs, budgeting and paying your tuition fees.